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LTC John Mohor
5
5
0
There's alwAys a reason to go on even if you the former warrior can't see it! I just wish more could realize it!
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SSgt Joseph Baptist
4
4
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Edited >1 y ago
When I was medically retired from the military, the VA counselors pushed hard for me to become a paralegal. I pushed back, holding out to become a teacher.

Teaching is my way of continuing to serve - particularly since I have been working with underserved populations (started in urban schools, now in a rural school). My students - "my kids" - are my mission, and I do everything in my power to teach them, mentor them, and help them to be successful.

While I do struggle with depression, it usually hits me during school breaks - not when I am working with students. It is a hard job, it is full of challenges and has a lot of frustrating moments - but it is also extremely rewarding.

My advice to other vets is to find something to do - either a job, or a volunteer position - where you make a difference in the world.

Find a new mission for yourself, and drive on!
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LTC David Brown
LTC David Brown
>1 y
Congratulations. Excellent post.
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Nicci Eisenhauer
3
3
0
There's a great book called "Once a Warrior, Always a Warrior" -- and it's true that there is always, ALWAYS a Warrior inside. However, it's equally true that many life situations can distance us -- never disconnect us -- but distance us, for sure, from our inner Warrior. And, it's important to know that PTSD is, in fact, a PHYSICAL injury! It becomes important to find "new routes" to find our way to reconnecting with our Warrior self. There are well-trodden paths to follow, and new ones, too. And there are ways to connect that are new and upcoming. The battle to our Warrior within will not be fought so alone much longer! Every moment of hanging on is a testament to your strength. That's rarely recognized OR felt as us as true. This life is lived moment by moment -- each painful one endured is a triumph. Choosing a painful life and continuing the fight IS heroic. It truly is. And every moment of continuing that fight, you're my hero and the same to many others who see that... because we've been there, too. And might be again -- sometimes the darkness comes and goes. There are times we are convinced it will never go. But it can be beaten back... and, little by little, there will be more light than dark. Stay connected... I'm working hard on this!
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
>1 y
I think your mistake is to assume that every soldier/marine/sailor that comes out and has trouble adjusting is PTSD. Perhaps the scene out of the movie "Jarhead" expressed it best, where the one Marine goes from being a Warrior to the scene in the Super Market with "clean up on aisle 9". It's the loss of being a vital and functioning member of a group, maybe Tribe is a better word for it. I never served a day in combat, but even I went from being responsible for millions of dollars of equipment and 160 odd men, or actually a Battalion since I was S1 when I left, to being an employee that was an important part of the company, but not like it was in the service. I miss it still today, which is part of the reason that I hang out here part of the time, to still get a bit of that feel of being part of that warrior culture. I think it is increasingly hard for the younger guys as society becomes more and more impersonal and the connections with family, church and community gets weaker and weaker.
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