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SSG Dave Johnston
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Looks like a return to "Battlefield" Medicine as practiced in the 1950's, 60. 70's and maybe half of the 1980's. While assigned to the LA MEPS from '86 to '89; a co-worker from the Navy gave me his Independent Corpsman Manual. [NAVEDTRA 10670-B / 10669-B] Published 1981. the material was a lot better that what I had with the US ARMY. I did me justice the year I was assigned to 1st US ARMY SPT BN MFO Saini Egypt.
Maybe that should be the training guide for all 68Ws coming out of Ft. Sam.
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SSG Emergency Department Registered Nurse
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You are correct! The Army switched over to whole blood Part way through World War II and continue to use whole blood up into the 70s. After that we switched to component therapy because, at the time, it was a safer and more tailored approach to resuscitation. We did not have an active Conflict at that time so most resuscitation took place in medical centers with blood banks. The return to Fresh whole blood started in 2015 with the US Army Rangers ROLO program. It has since spread to the 68W schoolhouse as well as many medical simulation training centers (MSTC, or "mystics") throughout the army.
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SSG Dave Johnston
SSG Dave Johnston
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SSG (Join to see) - I still think the US Army needs to look at the US Navy's "Independent Hospital Corpsman" training. When you look at the dumbing down of the MOS between the 1980's and 2000's. What influenced MEDCOM to train entry level Medics as EMT basic's, when "Nam" era Medics were just a few hours shy of being an LPN/LVN?
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SSG Emergency Department Registered Nurse
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SSG Dave Johnston The Army is currently teaching the first class of Expeditionary Combat Medics (ECM). The ECM has a greater emphasis on care in austere environments and will fill a role similar to that of a Navy IDC.
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