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LTC Eric Udouj
10
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0
Went almost my whole career - and then I ran dead into one. The greatest evil is not the toxic leader himself - but the leaders above him who see it fully but are AFRAID to act. Yes - AFRIAD - fearing that it could place their own career at risk - and so they look the other way or do nothing. When that toxic level creeps 3 level above a command - and into the heart of the Department of the Army staff - and no one raises a finger to stop him..... except a few very good folks who refuse to take it. And when he is challenged by others the toxic attempt to do everything they can to bring work to a complete halt. Ignoring such toxic officers should be the tombstone of his senior leader - because no one leads anything in such a climate. How did they get rid of him each time -- promote him or assign him elsewhere. The bridges they burn and damage they do is incredible... and yet no one is willing to take responsibility to stop such a toxic leader. I wondered after that incident - how many of the suicides occurring were because of such toxic leaders...
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CSM Geologist
CSM (Join to see)
5 y
LTC Eric Udouj - Roger Sir.
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CSM Geologist
CSM (Join to see)
5 y
LTC (Join to see) - I am not surprised. It is a shame that the real Toxic People get away with framing the ethical people. The worst part is the system and other people help them.
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LTC Eric Udouj
LTC Eric Udouj
5 y
LTC (Join to see) - As was the one I am referring to as well. And it was not under USSOCOM... where I was on staff.
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LTC Eric Udouj
LTC Eric Udouj
5 y
CSM (Join to see) - CSM - it really needss to be done from outside to be able to get the real picture - being an investigating officer from inside a command will find his day job in conflict when investigating a toxic leader. When CID or other comes in - it is in a different ball court and the toxic leader is unable to gain any pressure. But to get it to the outside level is difficult and time consuming - time a unit does not have.
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SFC Contract Administrator
7
7
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2LT N W. good read and solid share. I agree with:

A Task-Saturated Culture

The problem is that most leaders live in a task-saturated environment, which impedes them from analyzing the effects of their actions and discourages them from seeking ways to reach their unit’s, or their own full potential. Time and again, I’ve seen junior officers and NCOs struggle to find the cognitive space, for example, to apply creativity to their training events or develop long-term leader development plans. The endless supply of “5-meter targets” prevents leaders from being the guide their organizations need. And our culture rewards them for it.

Senior raters end up recommending advancement for subordinate leaders who tackle the near-term targets because 1) the tasks are usually coming from the senior chain of command, who has a vested interest in seeing them accomplished, and 2) the effort is visible and easy to measure. “How many on-time evaluations did A Company have?” is a lot easier to assess and evaluate than “Is the A Company Commander inspiring a culture of trust?” And most leaders are more comfortable having a conversation about the timeliness of evaluations than they are about establishing trust in the organization.

When senior raters focus on the flurry of near-term subordinate activity, they risk overlooking the methods by which subordinate leaders achieve the mission. Too often, immediately behind the curtain of a “successful” leader is an egocentric environment of micromanagement and mistrust that overworks its members and fails to personally and professionally develop them.

I experienced this the last 5 years of my career.
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Capt Tom Brown
5
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This issue seems to go with an earlier question concerning 'Do I report a toxic leader?" or words to that effect. Some commenters recommended against reporting because of the fear of retaliation. ie, let the person be promoted, then tripped up by someone else later on. My experience with toxic leaders suggests they (1)had a knack for getting things done; (2) were deemed as strict on subordinates but never to the point of being toxic; (3)acted quite nicely around seniors to impress them; (4)intimidated subordinates enough they would not dare to report them for fear of retaliation. As such the toxic leader can slide under the radar and get promoted rather than terminated.
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