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CPT Jack Durish
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I just wish they'd stop calling it Liberalism. The Left is not liberal. Indeed, they are the enemies of liberty.
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SSgt Joseph Baptist
SSgt Joseph Baptist
3 mo
It is unfortunate that illiberal leftists are often misidentified as "liberals". oNe reason that this happens is that they falsely advertise themselves as being "liberal", when they are far from it.

I wrote the following in 2017, when "liberals" from Antifa were violently attacking people in the town I grew up in, Berkeley, simply because they suspected that those people were "Trump supporters".

Unpacking the concept of the "illiberal left":
The true, or "classical" liberal, has an open mind, and values free speech, even when they don’t agree with the viewpoint being professed. They rely on the competition of various viewpoints in the "marketplace of ideas" to bring forth the "true" or "best" idea, rather than trying to impose one idea or group of ideas dogmatically, and forcing everyone to accept those ideas.


lib·er·al
adjective
1. 1.
open to new behavior or opinions and willing to discard traditional values.
2. 2.
(of education) concerned mainly with broadening a person's general knowledge and experience, rather than with technical or professional training.

1. 1.
a person of liberal views.

synonyms:
wide-ranging, broad-based, general
"a liberal education"

People who protest against free speech are not "liberal" at all. A liberal should want to allow an opponent to speak - possibly allowing their own words to make them look foolish, or possibly engaging them in a discussion or debate. Using violence to shut down speech, discussion, or debate is an illiberal act. It is more in line with an authoritarian, totalitarian, or even a fascist mindset. It is certainly a tactic employed by authoritarian, totalitarian, and fascist groups throughout history - including the group whose name we all seem to love to use to label our opponents - the Nazis.
What we commonly think of as a "liberal" in our society is a person who is not at all liberal, but who is often left of the political center, and authoritarian in their treatment of those who disagree with them.
While an actual liberal can lean fairly hard to the left or right, they will tend to be moderate in at least some areas – and may even be to the right of center on some topics and to the left of center on other topics.
The reason that “liberal” is thrown around as an epithet is that the word has come to be associated with people who are not liberal at all, but are exceptionally narrow minded and dogmatic in their approach to political and social issues, and demand conformity of belief from those around them.


When people are not exposed to differing viewpoints, liberalism tends to grow weak, and be replaced by dogmatic belief. Here in the bay area, we are in a leftist bubble – most of the viewpoints that we hear are left of center, and those who are more moderate, or even right of center are belittled, mocked, and often afraid to even speak out. This is why I referred to Harvey Milk’s statements about the importance of “coming out” for the gay community, because people who learned that they had friends, family members, coworkers, or other members of their community who were gay, were forced to readdress any homophobic prejudices that they had. Milk famously said that “people who know us are twice as likely to support our rights”.


I grew up in the SF bay area “bubble”, and like many people there, thought that most/all “smart” people thought in pretty much the same way. I was lucky to spend a fair chunk of my adult life living in different parts of the country – parts where the people are often dismissed as “poorly educated”, “ignorant”, “reactionary”, “hicks from the sticks”. “rednecks”, “trash”, or even “deplorables” by others in the bay area. Yes, I lived in “flyover country”, and I discovered that many of the people I met there were smart, well-educated, sensitive, thoughtful, and good people. Most of them did not even try to stereotype me based on where I was from, although a few seemed to think that SF and LA are right next to each other.


I’m guessing that one of the big reasons that pro-Trump people from the bay area feel it is important to hold a rally is to show the rest of us that they do exist, and that it is therefore not okay to casually and thoughtlessly dismiss and deride them at every turn. Just as you would have to start thinking twice before casually making racist, sexist, or homophobic statements once you realize that your friends include people from each of those groups, they want you to think twice about your casual condemnation of Trump supporters, and the hostile atmosphere that it creates for them (and also for others who are neutral about Trump).


The illiberal left tends to be quite Orwellian in its doctrine – engaging in “doublethink” to avoid having to accept the hypocrisy of many of their positions, hounding those who deviate from conformity for “thoughtcrime”, and even creating their own form of “newspeak” via the PC lexicon. Like Big Brother, they believe that “War is Peace” – as evidenced by their violent actions at “peaceful” protests, that “Freedom is Slavery” by their attempts to impose more and more state control over the lives of individuals, and that “Ignorance is Strength” by their repeated attempts to turn our schools, colleges, and universities into indoctrination centers, rather than institutions of learning, and by their increasingly violent attempts to suppress the free expression of any ideas that they disagree with – including actual liberals, whether left, center, or right.
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CPT Assistant Professor Of Military Science
CPT (Join to see)
3 mo
SFC Casey O'Mally - I understand that completely, and withdrawal my direction at Mr. Durish. I can almost guarantee that he is a fine American. But the left is an 'enemy' in the same way the 'right' is the 'enemy' in a large percentage of this country, and the use of those terms so close together trigger emotions both ways. It is no longer fellow Americans with disagreements, it has morphed into 'others', and created a complete disassociation that has opened the door to demonization far and beyond that of disagreement. Depending on your political persuasion, and the depth of your extremity in those areas, an 'enemy' of liberty is subjective.

That is the point.
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
3 mo
CPT (Join to see) - I have no problem disagreeing with my fellow citizens who share my allegiance to the Constitution. The Left are my enemies because they are enemies of the Constitution. Since they can't destroy it outright, they have been perverting it for the past 100 years.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
3 mo
CPT (Join to see) - On that, you and I are in violent agreement.

It has been, and continues to be, my basic philosophy that EVERYONE is better served when I do my level best to understand the viewpoints of those with whom I disagree. Even if I continue to disagree, I gain understanding of them, and WHY they feel that way. They aren't evil, or contemptible, or disgusting (in most cases - some are, including some I agree with, politically)... just... wrong :-P

Additionally, when I can truly understand "the opposition" I can much more readily predict and counter their political rhetoric and their attempts to move the country in what I feel is the wrong direction. And if I have TRULY worked to understand their viewpoint, I then have the option of either accepting it as being right and admitting I was wrong (it happens! Not often, but it does.) or preparing myself with talking points discussing the shortfalls of their position.

Everyone wins - "they" aren't "othered" or demonized, and I have a stronger political foundation for my positions.
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LTC Self Employed
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This is from the Author:

About the Book
Why did the left think they could solve the pandemic with burning cities, closed beaches, blue state budget bailouts, and mail-in ballots nobody asked for

The coronavirus has been a disaster for America, but it's been an unprecedented opportunity for the left. In They Never Let a Crisis Goes to Waste, Jason Chaffetz delves into progressive efforts to leverage crises to force their priorities into law. Whether the crisis is legitimate, fabricated, or exaggerated, the solution is always the same: more government, less individual freedom, higher spending, higher taxes.

He explores how disaster liberalism subjugates individual freedoms to political expediency in times of crisis, and how Republicans need to be ready for next time. Because when we allow government power to become unlimited in a crisis, the crises will become unlimited.

Across the board, Democrat leaders exploited the pandemic to achieve their agenda, invoking disaster liberalism to justify unpopular and unconstitutional power grabs. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam signed a gun control bill on April 10—three weeks into pandemic—because he wouldn't have to put up with tens of thousands of protestors. Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers announced he was making it a criminal offense to attend church or go to work, only to see his overreach struck down by the state supreme court. Nancy Pelosi rammed through a $3 trillion liberal wish list filled with proposals unrelated to COVID-19, that immediately died in the Senate.

If not for the courts and local media, many of the Democrats' schemes would have successfully been implemented. As it was, many were—and many of the most egregious violations of Americans' rights were celebrated across the left.

In They Never Let a Crisis Go to Waste, Chaffetz uncovers Democrats' game plan and calls upon all Americans to protect ourselves against future incursions. If we don't pay attention, the left will use every crisis to implement its radical plan, steadily eroding the freedoms we all hold dear. Only the American people have the power to stop the left's next power grab, as Chaffetz shows in this powerful, thoroughly-researched call to action. CPT Jack Durish LT Brad McInnis CSM Charles Hayden PO3 Bob McCord A1C Mike Allen CW3 Harvey Keck
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CW3 Harvey Keck
CW3 Harvey Keck
3 mo
We saw it in the gun confiscations in New Orleans because of the "emergency" of Katrina. Real smart -- have the police take people's guns, then pull out the cops and leave them unarmed and helpless.
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A1C Mike Allen
A1C Mike Allen
3 mo
This sound eerily like the plans used in 1933 (Reichstag fire).
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SFC Chuck Martinez
SFC Chuck Martinez
3 mo
I was asked about Article 1 of our constitution and here it is; Article I describes the design of the legislative branch of US Government -- the Congress. Important ideas include the separation of powers between branches of government (checks and balances), the election of Senators and Representatives, the process by which laws are made, and the powers that Congress has. However, the Supreme Court has ruled that Congress does have the latitude to delegate regulatory powers to ... of Clause One that Representatives shall be elected "by the People" to mean that, in those states with more than one. Section 1 vests all legislative powers of the federal government in a bicameral Congress. As explained above, this is often read to include a principle that legislative power cannot be delegated to the other branches, to individual members of Congress, or to private actors. We are literally giving the Congress full authorization to make laws that we the people do not like or want. Why should a body of the federal government have all the powers to establish laws we the people do not want, or give them the power to take away those laws we do want. Our State Senators and the Congress represent us the people, and they should follow the wishes of the people.

You hear about taking away amendments from our constitution and that is what I am referring to. for example the first 10; 1. Freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. 2. The Right to keep and bear arms in order to maintain a well regulated militia. 3. No quartering of soldiers. 4. Freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. 5. Right to due process of law, freedom from self-incrimination, double jeopardy. 6. Rights of accused persons, e.g., right to a speedy and public trial. 7. Right of trial by jury in civil cases. 8. Freedom from excessive bail, cruel and unusual punishments. 9. Other rights of the people. and 10. Powers reserved to the states. Number 10 refers to all 50 states where the people have a right to be heard and vote on new amendments or new laws added to our constitution which should then be carried by our representatives to the halls of the Congress and the Senate. No body in government should have the right to establish new amendment to the constitution without the blessings of all US citizens all across the country. We now have 27 additional amendments, Since 1789 the Constitution has been amended 27 times; of those amendments, the first 10 are collectively known as the Bill of Rights and were certified on December 15, 1791.

I just don't think that the Congress/Senate with the present members are not doing right by our constitution, and are in violation of. Especially trying to take away our right to bare arms.
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PO3 Bob McCord
10
10
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh6saOx-Q6s
Speaking of Our famous Democrat Nancy Pelosi
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A1C Mike Allen
A1C Mike Allen
3 mo
We moved from the shithole of a State that California has become.
That video is not exaggerating the situation. It is that bad. It is not exclusive to SF.
We live in Tennessee. We live in a safe, clean, neighborly, law-abiding, conservative area.
Do not California my Tennessee.
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CW3 Harvey Keck
CW3 Harvey Keck
3 mo
Gee Nancy!! Haven't you heard of Congressional Reps passing "pork" legislation for their home districts? You've been Speaker, and you didn't get enough pork bills passed for your constituents?
Or maybe you did, but your corrupt cronies took all the money for themselves.
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