Posted on May 2, 2019
SGT Thomas Cornfield
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LTC Jason Mackay
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Edited 1 mo ago
SGT Thomas Cornfield were you part of a dosimetery monitoring program while in the service?

The Army Dosimetry Center ADC as outlined in DA PAM 385-24 page 2 tracks soldier dosimetry records.
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SGT Thomas Cornfield
SGT Thomas Cornfield
1 mo
I was in charge of the film badges..not Dosimertry. until they stop them in turkey 1978/79 I was the NCOIC of the calibration facility in chalkmakly turkey and two years later in athen Greece, I also trained National Guard in Colorado from 1979 to 81
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LTC Jason Mackay
LTC Jason Mackay
1 mo
SGT Thomas Cornfield - that's a means of dosimetry. I'd do a FOIA request. Mention in the FOIA the areas where you wore film badges and request your records.
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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That would soley depend on your duties?
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SSG Charlie Davis
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I know this is apples and oranges, but for about five years, I was a Special Deputy US Marshal in which part of my assignment was to escort prison designated inmates from the FDC in Hawaii to California or beyond. We did this pretty much on a weekly basis sometimes two times a week. The USMS informed us of the exposure to cosmic radiation on long haul flights but were told that there was no real way to test for the exposure amount. I attach some notes culled from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH):
AIRCREW SAFETY & HEALTH
Cosmic Ionizing Radiation
Cosmic radiation is a form of ionizing radiation that comes from outer space. A very small amount of this radiation reaches the earth. At flight altitudes, passengers and crewmembers are exposed to higher levels of cosmic radiation.
There are no official dose limits for aircrew in the United States, but there are national and international guidelines.
• The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) considers aircrew to be exposed to cosmic radiation on their jobs. They recommend effective dose limits of 20 mSvExternal /year averaged over 5 years (that is, a total of 100 mSv in 5 years) for radiation workers and 1 mSv/year for the public. For pregnant radiation workers, the ICRP recommends a dose limit of 1 mSv throughout pregnancy. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has a 0.5 mSv recommended monthly radiation limit during pregnancy.
• European Union member states require assessment of aircrew exposure when it is likely to be more than 1 mSv /year, and adjustment of work schedules so that no individual exceeds 6 mSv/year.
• We are finding that some crewmembers may have exposure to cosmic radiation that is higher than what is recommended, and thus may be at greater risk for possible health effects.
• The World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) says that ionizing radiation causes cancer in humans. Ionizing radiation is also known to cause reproductive problems. We are looking more specifically at whether cosmic ionizing radiation is linked to cancer and reproductive problems.
• Most studies of radiation health effects have looked at groups with much higher radiation doses from different kinds of radiation (atomic bomb survivors; patients who received radiation therapy).

Just sayin'. . . Carry on. . .
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LTC Jason Mackay
LTC Jason Mackay
1 mo
He was a Nuke Tech and enrolled in dosimetry. Apples and lawn chairs.
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