Posted on Jun 28, 2017
SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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Posted in these groups: 141102-z-il062-067 Military bearing577963_465023533533674_1675317474_n ServiceCorporate-culture-492 Culture
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SSgt Gary Andrews
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I used to hear similar remarks in the Marines........"he's not a "real" Marine......usually made in reference to someone who had never served in combat (of which I was one who didn't). As was explained to me in stark terms by one of my drill instructors (it's detailed in my book God Bless Chesty).......once you become a Marine, the Marine Corps owns your ass and will send you where they need you......your job is to follow orders and accomplish whatever mission you are given. Some were given combat missions, some were needed elsewhere......it wasn't our own choice. So I always felt that everyone who earned the right to the title........was a "real" one, regardless of what assignment they received. You wear the uniform, you are real.
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LTJG Sandra Smith
LTJG Sandra Smith
22 d
Exactly. The ones to whom I always heard the term applied, having served priot to the end of the draft, were the "goldbricks". I never saw combat, in the typical sense, being Nurse Corps, yet we "fought" against disease, injury, and death, every day, including families of our troops. It seemed pretty "real" at the time...
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LTJG Sandra Smith
LTJG Sandra Smith
22 d
SSgt Jimmy Jackson Some of you, yes, but not all.
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LTJG Sandra Smith
LTJG Sandra Smith
22 d
LtCol George Carlson LOL! I'll bet it was!
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SSG Donald Campbell
SSG Donald Campbell
16 d
I only have one comment: How well would the "real soldiers" do without support. I was in Direct Support in helicopter maintenance in Vietnam. Retired from the MIANG in 2000.
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CPT Corporate Buyer
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As an infantryman myself I'd like to ask those people how far they think they would get without all those other soldiers doing their jobs. They'd run out of ammo/fuel/water/food/etc. pretty quickly. Not to mention they wouldn't get their CIB/medals/pay/insurance/etc. It's just stupid really.
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MSG Ivy Campbell
MSG Ivy Campbell
22 d
MSG Campbell
Sick, every one has job, if one fails we all would fail
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MAJ Karl Vogeley
MAJ Karl Vogeley
19 d
When I was an S4 in a Transportation BN, one of the companies had a motto "We may not be the pride of the Army, but without us, pride don't ride" I was an Ordnance officer and a Signal officer so to expand on that motto, without Combat Support and Service Support, no combat soldiers are going anywhere or fight for very long.
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CPL Marcellus Jordan
CPL Marcellus Jordan
16 d
ABSOLUTELY! Almost ANY and EVERY MOS is essential and supports the infantry in some direct or indirect manner. EACH JOB IS IMPORTANT! A hungry, sick, worried about his family because his payroll isn't right, vehicle won't operate, boots are worn, weapon not working... in SOME way ALL jobs are essential in order to keep the soldier healthy, mind right and ready to fight! And yes I was 11 Series 11H to be exact and I TRULY almost shed a tear EVERYTIME I saw the water truck coming, or the chow truck after having ate MRE's for what seemed like an eternity!
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CPL Sean Grogan
CPL Sean Grogan
15 d
SGT Milton Pridemore - M110A2 - Bring the rain! Fire Mission!
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SFC Intelligence Analyst
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I tend to not listen to people like that. They usually have no clue what they're talking about. A soldier is a soldier. I don't know how one can be more "real" than another. Do we have imaginary soldiers running around the Army or something?

I've heard it too - it's usually combat arms telling support soldiers they aren't "real" soldiers.

My first deployment - I was a SPC. It was just me and my LT in the S2. The CSM's PSD PSG used to give me so much crap about being a "fobbit" and I didn't know what was going on outside the wire so how I could do any intel reports, etc. One day he comes in and he wants the SIGACTs for the day. I said "Nope sorry." (I think he was a SSG). He said "Why not?" I said "Well I'm just a fobbit. I don't know what is really going on so I can't give you anything that will help, can I?"
He kind of glared at me and I did give him the information but still - I got tired of it. Yes I was a fobbit. I was on the FOB. Omg I must not have ever been a real soldier during both my deployments. I went out on as many patrols as I could. My LT wouldn't let me go out very much. (Who would do the work?). Everyone can't be outside the FOBs. Sorry.

If someone wants to act like they are big crap they can. Usually the ones who boast the most didn't really do much at all during their time.
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SPC Michael Terrell
SPC Michael Terrell
14 d
MAJ (Join to see) - All missions require teamwork. Even those on one man missions have to have others making sure they have the supplies and backup that they need.
Years ago I ran into someone cliaming to be an Air Force person who dealt with aircraft, on the old Usenet Newsgroups. He flatly told me that I as lying, and that the Army and Air Force had never shared a base, let alone train together. He claimed that the Air Force ATC dd not train at Carins Airfield, so I reminded him that the Air Force was part of the Army when it was formed. He finally shut up.
BTW, Carins was basically abandoned after WW-II. It was cleaned up and used for shooting some scenes for 'Twelve Oclock High'. I worked from the main RADAR building, until the IFF hardware was being upgraded in the early '70s. We were in the process of packing up to move, when I was told to pack my stuff, that I was going to Vietnam. When I got my orders a few days later, they had been changed to Ft. Greely, Alaska. Ironically, the building that I worked in there was build for the Lend-Lease Program. It was a steam plant, mess hall and barracks for Russian pilots to pick up American made planes and supplies. They were flown into Russia, refuled and ten delivered to their military. I was an Engineer for AFRTS there. Greely was one of the first bases to have a real radio station to provide news and entertainment for the troops.
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MAJ Aviation Combined Arms Operations
MAJ (Join to see)
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SPC Michael Terrell - Wow you have a lot of history. If I may suggest that you write the part about Ft. Rucker and sent it to the Museum. I never knew about the Russian connection. I only trained at Cairns for my basic Instructor Pilot designation. To me it is a shame for history to be lost. My father was a clerk typist for General Eisenhower and acted as one of his body guards. He got to see and hear things that made history. I was 15 when he passed away and now wished I had been interested in what he knew and saw but I did not. I as most teenagers knew everything and dad did not know anything. As I look back I wish I had listened to any story he had to tell and more importantly I wish I had listened and written it down.
I was in Normandy and kept seeing a sign for Maisy Battery. My wife and stayed in Grand Camp Maisy between Omaha and Utah Beaches. Went to Point Du Hoc to see where the Rangers scaled the cliffs. Amazing strength of body and mind. Never heard of Maisy Battery so I never drove down to see it. Well on the way home I bought a book at the airport. I read the book and found it very interesting. First I could not and still cannot understand why Maisy Battery was totally buried with sand. A British historian bought the property after stumbling on a ventilation duct. This happened about 2002 or 2003. He eventually unearthed what the US Army would call a reinforced artillery battalion. He questions if this was the real target of the invasion. He points out that Point Du Hoc was designated as Target #1 but LTC Rudder knew there were no guns there. The author is Gary Sterns I believe that is his name. I am more interested in why and who ordered the area completely sanitized when no other area was even attempted to be covered up. In his two books he provides copies of orders and assessments he obtained after declassification. But no mention of the covering of Maisy Battery. If you go to Point Du Hoc the craters from bombing and shelling are still there.
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SPC Michael Terrell
SPC Michael Terrell
14 d
MAJ (Join to see) - The Russians were in Alaska, not at Ft. Rucker.
It was probably buried to keep the Germans from trying to regain control of the site, and attacking from the rear. It is also possible that the site may have been highly contaminated from fuel or chemical spills.
There are some very highly contaminated areas of the Ft. Greely reserve, which is 100 square miles. They are so bad that if there is a forest fire, the just let those areas burn. They were used to develop Chemical, Biological and Nuclear weapons in the '60s.
The main base has a damaged, and abandoned Nuclear Power Plant that was used o develop Nuclear warheads to spread radioactive materials over an area, to make it unsafe to be in. It was shut down early in 1973, just a few months before I arrived. They just recently declassified this, and admit that the radioactive waste was diluted and fed back into the ground with the used cooling water.
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MAJ Aviation Combined Arms Operations
MAJ (Join to see)
13 d
Not sure it was buried to keep the Germans out. Too many others left intact in the area. Of the 1000s of targets for D-day Point Du Hoc was #1. Point Du Hoc was the one the news reels showed Rommel touring the defenses. The theory is that Gen Eisenhower selected Point Du Hoc as target #1 knowing there were no guns to show Rommel that he and the US were stronger and better. The guns at Maisy Battery fired until 9 June when the Rangers finally silenced them. The think that makes no sense is there is NO order to cover the battery that covers many acres of land. It took a lot of effort. The books by Gary Stern have morning reports, aerial photos, intelligence reports, orders to attack targets etc. but noting about Maisy battery other than it was a target and the bombing target, damage assessment and finally the Rangers attack. Just really strange.
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