Posted on Jun 24, 2019
SGT James Graham
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Hey, y'all. Ive got a problem. I recently applied at an international company for an armed security position here in the states. They set up an interview for tomorrow, and said to bring all my DD214s. The issue is, I never disclosed any of my previous affiliation with the military. It wouldn't be a problem since I was only ARNG, that's easy to hide. But I have 3 deployments, and 4 DD214s on my record. This company is an affirmative action employer, and aside from my hatred for my "service", I don't want to end up getting hired just because of a law that requires it based off my part time employment with the state, and fed government. They're going to do a thorough background check, so they would find out anyway, but at that point its up to them whether to hire me or not, instead of some law requiring it. It seems though they've already found out. Even though I answered no on all the vet and military questions.
How do I politely admit to them I am "prior service" (even though I was just NG), while at the same time declining to make that a part of my resume, and not come off as shady? Should I email them back today telling them so? I've never had a problem before because the employers just did a very basic check if any. I really want this job, but I only want it if I'm hired for being me not because of an 8 year mistake I made after high school.
Do I confess to it, or just keep hiding it?
Thanks.
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SGT Javier Silva
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Edited 4 mo ago
SGT James Graham - You call serving your nation a "mistake," but you look to the very same community for help. Hm. If you didn't disclose it, that is/was completely up to you. The law doesn't require you disclose any of it. I would e-mail the company asking them to verify the need for you to bring the DD-214. A simple sentence should do. "Ma'am/Sir, I don't believe I marked myself as a Veteran. Do I need to bring a DD-214? Or is this just standard saying?" Or something to that effect. Remember that an employer does not have to hire you because of lying on an application. Being a Veteran is not protected under Affirmative Action. If the job is in the private sector they don't have to give you any preference, even after disclosing your "mistake". The federal, state, county, and municipal governments are required to give preference to Veterans, but only if that Veteran is also qualified for the position they are applying for. Also, certain levels of employment in government do not give preference at all. Hope this helped.
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SGT Javier Silva
SGT Javier Silva
9 d
CPL Joseph Elinger - Negative. You cannot "have your cake and eat it to." I've made mistakes in my life and in the military; however, I don't consider joining a mistake. If you consider joining a mistake, then why would you ask the same community you just called a mistake for help?

We're here to help each other, I get it. As brothers and sisters who have done what the other 99% won't, I get it. With that, I do take offense at someone calling the service a mistake (which infers a wrong choice).
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Kenn Evans
Kenn Evans
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I wish I could respond in a positive light, a mistake, It sounds more like I put my ass on the line for God, Country and my fellow mankind. That is an honor to be worthy of being protected by you and thousands of others. If they have a specific policy, then render unto Caesar what is Caesars and roll with it. If you really want to work for this company be upfront and honest with them and yourself. If you lie or make an impression of lying, they could pass you over or when finding the info after fact, fire you for not being truthful and upfront. If a business cannot be supportive of our vets, I wouldn't work for them. You are worth more than that.
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Mike Patterson
Mike Patterson
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I would love to see that application because I can assure you if they are that much of a PC company there was an option, “Prefer not to disclose” or “I don’t identify as any of the above”.
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SGT Javier Silva - For some people, the choice to serve may have been the best of bad options. I suspect that in the case of this trooper, he had multiple bad experiences with toxic leaders. Having served in the National Guard, I can attest to the possibility that nepotism and politics can ruin a good unit and with it the soldiers in it. I have even experienced first hand that the National Guard can be the unit of last resort for poor performing officers and NCOs. They don't get to re-enlist with the Active Duty/Reserve components but are not marked as 'no re-enlistment.' So, they find a home in the National Guard, provide their political contributions to the right party, have business relationships with their unit leadership and they stay until they retire or die, getting promoted all the way. Too many good soldiers get chewed up in the process. However, your point about not treating service as a mistake is a valid one. Service is service and most choose not to serve. The best advice I can give to anyone with heartache about their military service is to treat the experience as a great learning opportunity and accept that it isn't a lifestyle they want longer than their initial contract. More importantly, move forward and drop the chip. No use in beating them up for not having the positive attitude most have because they didn't have the same experience and haven't learned to move on. It is worse, if he suffers from PTSD or experienced sexual trauma. Both of these tend to create a bad experience on how the service treats them.
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GySgt Kenneth Pepper
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Politely admit to them that you are prior service. If you wish to defer veteran's preference you can (in most states).
If I interviewed someone who did not disclose previous military experience I would be very skeptical.
Just curious, why downplay your service and the merits of serving to a group such as RP?
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GySgt Kenneth Pepper
GySgt Kenneth Pepper
4 mo
Fair enough.
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MSgt Kurt S.
MSgt Kurt S.
4 mo
SGT James Graham - Sounds like a child molesters confession...but aside from that, they will want full disclosure up front and then they investigate to verify. If that is an issue with you, then maybe you should not be working there. They might have you doing something you don't like with people you like...can they depend on you?
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SGT James Graham - Then focus on the people and drop the attitude about what you did. Unless it was illegal, unethical or immoral, then accept that you followed orders, did your job and decided to take another path at the end of your service.
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Cpl Randy Owen
Cpl Randy Owen
1 d
You said it was a security position. You have already proven you can't be trusted. If they hire you, they can't be trusted. Hope its not a company like blackwater that has huge government contracts.
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MAJ Ken Landgren
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Did something negative happen while serving? How is the company using affirmative actin to hire folks?
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CPL Gregory Ellis
CPL Gregory Ellis
1 mo
SGT James Graham - AA protections are not crap they were put into place so that veterans, women, minorities, and other underserved applicants would at least be get into the door and have an opportunity to interview or be considered for certain positions that in the past they would not have. If you really feel that strongly about not wanting to detail your service there is no law saying you have too, and you can state as much to HR. Not sure why you served and are now so against your service. But I hope that whatever happened to you that you find a way to work through it and come out on the other side of this, because as another soldier said it seems kind of ironic that you would come here for answers after expressing what you did about your time in service.
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SGM Michael Womer
SGM Michael Womer
1 mo
Do you require a security clearance for the job? If so you are required to disclose who laster held your clearance.
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SGM Michael Womer
SGM Michael Womer
1 mo
Most companies could care less about "AA" programs. They will not hire you because you are military, they will hire you because you are qualified and capable. As a Defense Contracting Company Vice president and Retired SGM I have participated in the hiring process for nearly a thousand people, companies comply with Equal Opportunity Laws. Former soldiers are not considered under represented in the Affirmative Action Program so not sure what the worry is. If you want to work in a Defense Contractor I strongly suggest you divulge your military background, they are considered highly qualified and capable. If in the hiring process I have an applicant answer questions dishonestly I just simply move on, pride in service is immaterial. While you may not be required to disclose your past military service lying on a job application is lying. The defense industry functions because of former soldiers, sailors, airman and marines, especially in defense services sector.
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SP5 Al Seden
SP5 Al Seden
7 d
ON THE LAST DAYS of grad school, i indirectly was told that the chair of the department had been a draft dodger during the '60's. after four years of attendance with very high marks i submitted my app at both a private company and at the PALO ALTO VA. I was rejected. do u think there could be a connection?.... duh! now i gots a big student loan so much for the 'good work" of the VA,
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