Posted on Mar 13, 2018
CPT Physical Therapist
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According to a recent nationwide study, only 13% of college and university presidents believe that "Most Americans have an accurate view of the purpose of higher education." Interestingly enough, the survey didn't reveal what these administrators thought the purpose of higher education was. In your opinion, what is the purpose of higher education? Is it to train individuals for a career? Is it to help individuals grow personally and intellectually?
Edited >1 y ago
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CPT Jack Durish
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This is a helluva good question. Once upon a time, I thought I knew. I'm not so sure anymore. Our institutions of higher education have been perverted into indoctrination centers and I can't see any downside except that people who attend them come away with a complete lack of ability to think for themselves. They possess no common sense. Now, before you dismiss me as some old crackpot, let me assure you that I am. I've seen too much to avoid being old or a crackpot. I lived in Colorado at a time when the state considered allowing people who had studied law in a legal practice under the tutelage of a practicing lawyer, to take the bar exam and become licensed attorneys. The law schools made sure that went away. I've seen doctors fresh out of medical school who need nurses to teach them the ropes of practicing medicine. The truth is, that people learn professions by practicing them. That's why they're called medical practices and legal practices. Meanwhile, engineering students are taught engineering on the job. Their degrees seem to prepare them for that profession as practiced in another age, long ago, when their professors might have been engineers. Shall I go on? Naw. That's enough for now. In all my years, I hoped for much from college grads and learned to expect little. Hopefully they could read. Many couldn't. Better yet, read for understanding. That was really rare. Research. Debate. Cipher (you know, basic math) The scientific method? Good luck finding that. History? Civics? Not one iota.
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MAJ Contracting Officer
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Do away with the artificial barriers to entry requirements and you'll see a gradual remarkable shift in our education system. Liberty works.
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
>1 y
MSG Dan Walther - Thank you for sharing that insight. I use many sources hosted in Britain for my own research. I also have correspondents (dare I call them friends?) there with whom I can discuss history intelligently. On a further note, my first book was written for American college students who could not read above a third grade level. I was restricted to a 1,200-word vocabulary and had to use short simple sentences, though the subject matter had to be of interest to a young adult. A professor once admitted that he had post-graduate students who also were functionally illiterate, but were well-indoctrinated.
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MAJ Contracting Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
>1 y
MSG Dan Walther - And the barriers to entry into the job field, a doctor needs a medical degree, a lawyer needs a law degree, and engineer needs an engineering degree. but do they really, Universities have a monopoly on the good paying white color jobs, because of law, not due to nature. For instance someone working in an engineering firm can never be a PE regardless of their knowledge base and experience they can have all the requisit knowlege from years studying, but can't practice without checking the university box. For engineers and doctors it's not that off kilter, but for a high school teacher, give me a break, I'm qualified to teach 18 year old aspiring teachers how to teach at a university, but I can't teach the 18 year old kids without a 4 year study plan and an education degree??? I'm sorry but there are other ways to learn the required skills, but unions have lobbied to make becoming a teacher difficult so they have a teacher shortage and need to pay the teachers more, and you can't fire your teachers who can't teach. The only way to become a teacher is to decide when you are 19. There is no economic viable option once you have a degree in Math, because a person with a math degree can't teach high school math, only an education degree counts in many of our states.
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LTC Ken Connolly
LTC Ken Connolly
11 mo
I have nieces and nephews graduating from colleges and all have some really challenging careers. One of my nieces works on a team developing and marking computer games and she is not the team administrator. :)
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MCPO Roger Collins
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Being a BA or MA is usually the key to get a job in a corporate setting. A PHD is normally of value, if seriously applied. The ability to research subjects and evaluate them is what separates them from other which results in advancing in a corporate structure. There are exceptions. I have hired all sorts of education levels, the PHD is the only one that was able to pass me up, on occasion. Most of them were arrogant self centered A-holes.
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AB Flight Engineer
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1 mo
It is important to obtain the higher education if you wish to achieve success in your profession.
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LTC Laborer
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Edited >1 y ago
Depends on who you ask. The parents think the purpose of higher education is to ensure their kid has all the education needed to enjoy a successful and lucrative life. Ask the kids these days and they'll tell you it's a 4 year delay in having to face up to life ... maybe 5-6 if they have trouble finding their classrooms and get failed on absenteeism.

I read recently that some 50% of college entrants don't complete ... and out of the remaining 50%, only 50% or less complete in 4 years. The rest take 5-6. IMV, a large percentage of kids that go to college go with (1) no idea of what they want to come out as; (2) poor preparation in high school for college; (3) insufficient self-discipline to capitalize on their time in college or university. For those that emerge at the end of the tunnel with a college degree, many find that their degree isn't worth the paper it is printed on in terms of getting them a well-paying job.

I'd really like to hear the assessments of some of our veterans that are currently attending colleges and universities on their non-veteran classmates.
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PO2 Eric K.
PO2 Eric K.
>1 y
Definitely feel like undergrad was a waste of time, but I just completed bachelors on GI Bill - maybe a Masters is necessary these days? Anyway, experience was miserable, but wasn't comfortable with online program and figured I needed at least a semi-well known school with regional accreditation. I'm now working in a job that does not require a degree, but pay is okay and federal employment was always rumored to be notoriously difficult to initially break into....I mean, the outcome could be worse. Still, there are too many people with degrees and not enough attractive positions outside of IT, engineering or something that will end up putting you in the hole for first year (esp those poor souls with significant forms of debt). Of course, if there are those that enjoy preferential treatment, but just gotta find a way round that jazz.
I will say that I would still get some sort of higher ed, but I think the push for a 4 year degree is a mistake anymore. Work experience and certs are what sell - the piece of paper is just a box to check off out of common practice for HR personnel.
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LTC Ken Connolly
LTC Ken Connolly
11 mo
I believe high school should be 5 years, where each person acquires a trade skill as one of the criteria to graduate.
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