Posted on Feb 20, 2020
SPC Richard Zacke
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I served from 1978 to 81 and when someone says thank you for your service I feel like I'm stealing the thunder of the troops that are seving in these two wars. Mainley because I don't remember anyone saying it before. I remember being called baby killer or being spit at.
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Lt Col Robert Canfield
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Edited >1 y ago
As I remember it, the 60s-80s were peak decades of the cold war. One of the key missions was nuclear deterrence...i.e. convincing the Soviets that engaging in ANY type of nuclear exchange would be a very bad idea. Its a scenario where both parties lose (although one may lose more than the other), or... both parties win. It involved keeping a strong, active force that could respond rapidly under a variety of scenarios. Fortunately a nuclear WWIII never occurred and many would say that, in the end, the US won more than the Soviets. But, again deterrence worked and the unthinkable did not occur. Sun Tzu said that it is best to win without conflict. I think that applies to the cold war. Whenever folks say that the US was not engaged in any major conflict during the 70s and 80s (after Vietnam), I remind them of what could have occurred if the US and NATO had not put forth a credible deterrent. A deterrent that required effective weapon systems, well trained personnel, and a commitment to win....and that's not chopped liver. If you served during those years then you deserve a handshake & a word of thanks. The world would be so much worse had the cold war deterrence mission failed.
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SPC Robin Price-Dirks
SPC Robin Price-Dirks
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Thank you, even my husband of 29 years has said to me that I served but I wasn't a soldier. He was a reservist in the Marines 6 years I think, I served in the active ARMY 6 1/2 years active and was forced out by high cutoff scores and draw downs. I really appreciate when some one thanks me because I keep getting told that I didn't really serve. I was in FRG from 1978 to 1980 and we had to leave our kasernes in groups of 6 or more for safety from terrorist's, oh and they tried to blow up General Haig while I was there. Yeah, I never really served........and I lost my only real family when I was forced out..............
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SPC Mike Tierney
SPC Mike Tierney
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SFC Louis Willhauck, MSM, JSCM, and ARCOM - If Iran used a nuke, their end would come from the US and/or Israel. Building nukes is a wonderful political message for Iranians. "look at us, standing up to the US". We keep producing weapons to feed politicians. They want money for their districts and Congress complies by buying more weapons we don't need.
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SFC Louis Willhauck, MSM, JSCM, and ARCOM
SFC Louis Willhauck, MSM, JSCM, and ARCOM
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SPC Mike Tierney - Your response seems contradictory. Are you against the US having "Nukes" based on they're being a waste of money?
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PO2 Gerry Tandberg
PO2 Gerry Tandberg
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I served active duty from 1962 to 1965 as an AE2 in a carrier based VA squadron on a bird farm. I later joined the active reserve and flew crew in a VP ASW squadron until 1968. I always considered myself fortunate not having to serve at the tip-of-the-spear like so many friends in the Army and Marine Corps. I acknowledge those who thank me for my service, however I immediately think of those combat veterans, many who were not so fortunate to come home, or came home damaged. I worked three years with a Veterans organization to help wounded warriors. Do I feel guilty? No!, but I try to put myself in their shoes because so many are still angry and continue to fight a war that is now more personal. Seldom does a combat vet open up to a non-combat vet. We try to understand but theirs experiences are so vastly different than ours. We are all Vets, but I appreciate and have a special reverence for our combat Vets.
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LTC John Griscom
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You served; you earned it.
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A1C Isa Kocher
A1C Isa Kocher
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as an disabled vet antiwar activist in the 60s, along with my friend RG a medal of honor winner, we got beaten up really badly. and people said ugly things. you wouldn't think police liked to arrest you, cuff you, than throw you into the wagon from several feet away, no food in the jail no doctor. my friend allen too, a priest
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SPC Mike Tierney
SPC Mike Tierney
28 d
SFC Charles McVey Sr. - I returned from Vietnam in February 1969. I returned to college in June of 1969. At no time did I ever experience any disrespect or abuse for my time in the Army. I did join Vietnam Veterans Against the War and was warmly welcomed by that group.
I had a profile so I was assigned to a Fin Sec at Ft. Meade, MD. From there we went to DC and NYC. Never had an issue in those locations either.
I guess I was lucky.
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SFC Charles McVey Sr.
SFC Charles McVey Sr.
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The very fact that you were a member of Vietnam Veterans Against the war say's everything I need to hear, or want to hear.
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SPC Mike Tierney
SPC Mike Tierney
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SFC Charles McVey Sr. - Hey Chuck, it was a stupid war. Americans died for absolutely no reason. Oh wait, it was the dominos effect, right? How did that work out? We should have supported Diem since he was a huge crook. But he was willing to placate our politicians. Ho was our ally in WWII but, oh no, he was a communist. Can't have them solidifying their country. Nope, we needed a solid guy like Diem to steal our money.
Sorry Chuck, you need to hear a lot more.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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Edited 6 mo ago
One should never be ashamed for serving. It's that simple. Civilians don't understand what it means to fight for your buddies on the 9 and 3 o'clock. They don't understand hold at all cost orders because another unit is counting on yours. They don't understand the bond and love we have for each others as we train hard, fight hard, and share pictures of our families. They don't know what we are willing to sacrifice on behalf of our buddies and the country. We understand it, they do not. We should keep our heads up high regardless of where you served.

Nobody should be punished when the deity favors and smiles upon some military members in this random universe of chance. When someone exhibits guilt in regards to not going to war while I converse with the person, I tell the person that I am glad you did not go to Vietnam. Don't sweat it. It was not your time to go. I am glad you did not go.

I can sort of empathize with guilt. Sometimes it bothers me and humbles me when I think that I never experienced a war like WWII, Korean War, and Vietnam War.
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PO2 Steven Russell
PO2 Steven Russell
3 mo
MAJ (Join to see) - I agree that my return from Viet Nam was not a warm one from the protesters that were there in 1970. Today, when a passerby says "thanks for your service" due to my wearing my Viet Vet cap, I say "I am proud that I volunteered to serve".
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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PO2 Steven Russell - I have so much love for them. I have a strategic spot on my heart for them.
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SPC Mike Tierney
SPC Mike Tierney
28 d
Most soldiers don't either, Ken. I think only about 10% of military ever see combat. If anyone wants to read a great book about military unity try "The Last Stand of Fox Company" A true story about a Marine unit in Korea in 1950. Just an amazing account of courage.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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There was a lot of courage displayed in that war. Do know the story of General Ridgeway and the Korean War?
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