Posted on Feb 20, 2020
SPC Richard Zacke
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I served from 1978 to 81 and when someone says thank you for your service I feel like I'm stealing the thunder of the troops that are seving in these two wars. Mainley because I don't remember anyone saying it before. I remember being called baby killer or being spit at.
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Lt Col Robert Canfield
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Edited 12 mo ago
As I remember it, the 60s-80s were peak decades of the cold war. One of the key missions was nuclear deterrence...i.e. convincing the Soviets that engaging in ANY type of nuclear exchange would be a very bad idea. Its a scenario where both parties lose (although one may lose more than the other), or... both parties win. It involved keeping a strong, active force that could respond rapidly under a variety of scenarios. Fortunately a nuclear WWIII never occurred and many would say that, in the end, the US won more than the Soviets. But, again deterrence worked and the unthinkable did not occur. Sun Tzu said that it is best to win without conflict. I think that applies to the cold war. Whenever folks say that the US was not engaged in any major conflict during the 70s and 80s (after Vietnam), I remind them of what could have occurred if the US and NATO had not put forth a credible deterrent. A deterrent that required effective weapon systems, well trained personnel, and a commitment to win....and that's not chopped liver. If you served during those years then you deserve a handshake & a word of thanks. The world would be so much worse had the cold war deterrence mission failed.
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PO1 Kevin Dougherty
PO1 Kevin Dougherty
4 d
CWO4 David M - I served with two different ETCMs who had been bubbleheads. They both lateraled over to get some shore time as their kids were getting older. My brother and I still rib each other, re skimmers and bubbleheads.
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CWO4 David M
CWO4 David M
4 d
PO1 Kevin Dougherty - My brothers and I do the same but I hit them with puddle jumper and crispy critter as well as skimmer. We used to say there were only 2 kinds of ship, submarines and targets....lol
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Sgt Ed Allen
Sgt Ed Allen
4 d
PO1 Kevin Dougherty - Thank you. I can never remember when the draft ended. And, I was young enough to not have to worry about Vietnam. Although, growing up 3 miles from Camp Pendleton and having 2 brothers and 2 uncles serve during that time, I was very much aware of it.

I know the draft ended before the "conflict" ended as my brother and his 2 best buddies went down to the recruiter and joined the Navy because they figured it wouldn't be long until they would get drafted. Then, 2 weeks into boot, the draft ended. He served most of his time afloat. His last tour being off the coast of Vietnam aboard a little boat called the USS Constellation. He was there during the evacuation.

His previous ship was the USS Hassayampa where, according to my brother, morale was a low as it could be and race riots drug use were the norm.

I don't know how you guys did it. Staying aboard ship for months at a time or in hollow tubes under the waves. I got hated being stuck on an island (Okinawa)for a year. And I could drive! I would say you were a better man than I, except that, as a Marine, I know better!

Anyway, I wish you well and thank you for your service.
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PO1 Kevin Dougherty
PO1 Kevin Dougherty
3 d
Well the USCG is harder to get into and more elite than it's younger brothers. I actually enjoyed my sea time. The sea is referred to as a mistress, and in my case it was true, she seduced me forever.
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LTC John Griscom
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You served; you earned it.
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SPC Kelly Grindstaff
SPC Kelly Grindstaff
3 mo
PFC Kimberly Staiti - What you mentioned is where I had duty and Missions through out that region and you are correct, no purple hearts, no combat badges or CIBs. Still got my EIB first try. We had the Army Commendation Medals and Army Achievement Medals that where given out. We were stationed in Panama and if hurt, folks were helicoptered into Gorgas Hospital on Fort Amador, Panama City. I was injured and spent 2 weeks there and my had a view of the Helipad and it was always busy in and out. We lost people and weren't allowed to say how or where they were hurt. Had to wait until I got out of the service before you could tell the families the truth.
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SFC Peter Krarup
SFC Peter Krarup
2 mo
A1C Gus Mimikos - If McArthur had gone into Manchuria, there would have been WW3, with the entirely possible result of the human race being wiped out either through direct nuclear attack or post-attack radiation poisoning. Therefore no Korea, Japan, US, Canada, Mexico, South America, Europe, Africa, USSR, China, etc. I have to wonder where you've received an education.
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SFC Terry Wilcox
SFC Terry Wilcox
1 mo
SGT Michael Gregory - Sarge, Do you remember the name of the post that was next door to Camp Sears? For the life of me I cannot remember - I think it's - OLD AGE! Not Camp Casey or Camp Red Cloud - ???
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SSG Glenn Wilson
SSG Glenn Wilson
1 mo
Maybe Camp Essayons or Kyle.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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Edited 4 mo ago
One should never be ashamed for serving. It's that simple. Civilians don't understand what it means to fight for your buddies on the 9 and 3 o'clock. They don't understand hold at all cost orders because another unit is counting on yours. They don't understand the bond and love we have for each others as we train hard, fight hard, and share pictures of our families. They don't know what we are willing to sacrifice on behalf of our buddies and the country. We understand it, they do not. We should keep our heads up high regardless of where you served.
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SFC Peter Krarup
SFC Peter Krarup
2 mo
Feelings are, by nature, irrational, so that's understandable. I'd just be happy that I wasn't there at the time, be grateful for my time in the service, be grateful for those who did serve at that time, and do what I can for them. I'm a member of the VFW and American Legion and participate in both Color Guards and Honor Guards for veteran's funerals, as well as other volunteer work in my community. I can only do so much while also taking care of family, house, & home.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
MAJ (Join to see)
2 mo
I want to say thank you for your volunteer work. While I was on active duty I volunteered to preside over military funerals as OIC because my buddy had no experience doing them. What I try to give back to the military community is helping people with PTSD. I have had some success which makes me happy. My therapists could not connect with me, so I essentially healed myself and consequently wrote a PTSD Paper that I share via internet link. It gives me purpose and satisfaction. I use to be mad for having PTSD but I see it as a gift now.
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SGT Lorenzo Nieto
SGT Lorenzo Nieto
25 d
Could not have said it better
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Sgt Ed Allen
Sgt Ed Allen
4 d
SFC Peter Krarup - I think you hit the nail on the head. You, and I, say "grateful to have served".

I was proud, grateful and blessed to have been given the option to serve my country and my brothers and sisters at arms.

It's all about the heart.
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