Posted on Jul 31, 2020
MSgt Brendon Grimes
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What are your thoughts given some basic info? Fraud, Criminal Intent, PTSD & psychology.
An Army infantry soldier completes a first term 4 year enlistment, excited following 9/11. Possibly serves only one overseas tour, and never fires his weapon in combat. Gets out of Army following enlistment and joins Army Guard. Within first year of guard duty (upon orders for overseas tour) claims PTSD threatens to kill his comrades. Is released from duty.
Member has tried for 12 years to get benefits, and finally receives 100% disability. Claims to his family that his PTSD disease is cured. Does not follow psychologists prescriptions, as they are not really needed.
Was member fit for duty when enlisting in the Army Guard? Or did this member fraudulently join having pre-existing condition?
Can this member have concealed carry and go hunting, when he claims PTSD for gunfire?
would you consider this member to be defrauding the government and taxpayer?
Soldier has lied to family members claiming to be heroic sniper, only to reveal as lies later, having never fired his weapon in actual combat. Possibly used similar lies to VA psychologist.
How would you approach situation? VA does not seem to care, and does not offer path for investigation.
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SSgt Engineering
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Edited 4 mo ago
This post goes all over the place so I’ll try to address, but you have a million different things going on here.

Ok, first you need to review the definition of PTSD and understand how it works.

PTSD does not require more than a second of an event and it doesn’t matter if you never fire your weapon, or even have a weapon for that matter. PTSD can occur for a host of reasons, combat is just one example.

Now, to the meat of your issue.

Upon enlistment, you are given an enlistment examination. They go through things and determine your baseline. Do people hide things, of course. For now though, these entrance exams (MEPS) are what we have and what we use.

The VA has ways of confirming stressors. It’s possible he is embarrassed about what actually happened or that maybe what caused his issues is none of anyone else’s business. Being awarded a 100% diagnosis for mental health comes with certain hurdles. Perhaps telling people he is doing better is just his way of coping or trying to feel like he has trust in any people.

In the end, you are making some huge assumptions based on incomplete knowledge. There is a chance you are right, there is a chance you are wrong. Is it really worth it for you to find out?

Sorry if this comes across harsh. I once had a disability claim presented to me that had a person who served for A couple weeks in the army and was discharged due to failure to adapt. On first glance, I was annoyed. After reading more and digging some, come to find out the soldier was raped by someone in the basic training leadership on the second day they were there. It is easy for us to try to judge and decide for ourselves wether people warrant disability. No deployment, e-1 basic training “washout” or victim/survivor of a viscous crime... For me though, unless I see a guy acting like they can’t walk stroll to their car while doing jumping jacks after an exam, I won’t be judging.

If they are 100% for psych, they should have also had a competency hearing with the VA. If determined, by the VA to be competent, they can continue to hold a concealed carry and own and purchase firearms. If deemed incompetent, they have their rights restricted there under the Brady Act
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SSgt Michael Bowen
SSgt Michael Bowen
1 mo
PO3 John Raymond - I was MED -VAC from Iraq and was asked at WR hospital when after a month in the hospital i was being released for a med board . I didn't answer the question i just said i don't think i need to answer that question .and they moved on . But when i reported to the VA hospital as part of the med board they asked again and acted like i had to answer . That's when i came up with the sarcastic reply that ended them asking . Maybe being MED - VAC triggers the question .
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PO3 John Raymond
PO3 John Raymond
1 mo
SSgt Michael Bowen - That could be the case. I certainly didn't go through that. I'm also not saying my experiences match everyone elses because the VA certainly didn't do right by me initially...though they do pretty good now most of the time.
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SSgt Michael Bowen
SSgt Michael Bowen
1 mo
I understand . and i also know how sometimes the VA don't do right by us till they are made to. Case in point being MED-VAC to WR from Iraq i had some parts put into me at WR Hospital and they said to keep the parts from clotting i would have to be on a med for the rest of my life . The VA later sent me a notice with out consulting with WR Hospital that They reviewed my medications and felt i no longer needed to take it and they would no longer supply it to me . 2 and 1/2 months later that decision literally killed me . And i say literally because the part did clog and my heart stopped beating and i stopped breathing to me that's dead . But because i was able to drive myself to the hospital before it stopped the doctor was able to revive me and repair the damage . so i didn't stay dead . Both He and my VA remote care doctor sent letters to the VA and the VA responded by sending me a letter saying they would start reissuing me the med and there would be no further stoppage or review of the meds i have to take . I guess they felt it was Cheaper then a possible law suit from my widowed Wife .LOL
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LTC Ben Chlapek
LTC Ben Chlapek
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SSgt. Addison R.: Excellent answer with great examples. Thank you!
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SSgt Marvin Cole
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Every veteran who has served in a combat zone suffers from PTSD at some level. Some very small, some very large.

Some Veterans bring their Anxieties and Mental Issues with them when they enter the military. The nature of Service Connected simply implies that whatever that person did in the Military resulted in less than maximum participation in the workforce.

It is way to complicated to find simple solutions. The process of obtaining a PTSD disability is strenuous and goes thru several level to ultimately reach the level of disability.

War Zones changes people.

I am 90% Service Connected, paid at 100% because I am unemployable. The process I went thru was filled with Psychiatrist, Psychologist, and Counseling visits. Immensely helpful. I function well today, because I do not have to worry about finances. I do not have to worry about medical care. I do not believe I could do it without my VA disability.

You cannot always tell what's in a book by it's cover. Judging others without the benefit of all the information is just rumor mongering and just being a busy body. The professionals in the VA have done their job! None of us, should judge them without having the proper credentials.
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MSgt J D McKee
MSgt J D McKee
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I'm sorry for your experience. Jeez. I just spewed coffee all over my computer when I read that from laughing, though....
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GySgt Sncoic (Staff Non Commission Officer In Charge)
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He wouldn’t know that. He loads aircraft in Kuwait and then judges other veterans warfighting efforts.
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GySgt Sncoic (Staff Non Commission Officer In Charge)
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MSgt Brendon Grimes, the VA has his records! A licensed PSYCHIATRIST diagnosed him with PTSD before he would even rate a Comp and Pen exam. I hope this soldiers finds out what a POS you are trying to sway people with your story, hoping that throwing a match will start a fire to cause him harm. You’re a PUSSY!
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GySgt Sncoic (Staff Non Commission Officer In Charge)
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I’m P&T since my BDD retirement claim. I crawled to retirement my last two years, but I still have assholes who never served or barely served (I have five combat tours IN country) that pass judgment like this zoomie. This really gets under my skin. It’s such a passive aggressive bitch move to target someone he clearly has an issue with. Like this loadmaster knows more than a licensed Psychiatrists and VA Raters who have the veterans whole record.
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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No offense but there is certainly a lot of he said, she said, and speculation. As for PTSD, many pepp op or are affecting by things in life differently. It could be that he made up stories about his experience in order to justify his level of PTSD, not wishing to admit that the environment itself got to him. As for telling his family one thing only to recant is a classic sign that he may be dealing with deeper issues, I.e. there is nothing wrong with me, you have nothing to fear I mad me it all up. This is done, in some instances, to take the concern from the family. As for not taking meds, that too is a common issue.

The psychologists at the VA have the distinct advantage of accessing his entire military and medical record, they know where he was, for how long, and in most cases what he experienced.

If he is legit, then his Family should ask to attend a family counseling session with the VA in order to learn how to support him, he’ll he is troubled either way, PTSD or not. So money aside he needs help. Also, the VA reassess all levels of compensation about every five years until about 55. They will also review over 55 if the condition is one that is thought to be repairable. So, if he is a fraud he will be found out, and removed or reduced.

So my first thought would be the benefit of the doubt, if he won’t attend a family session, I recommend his loved ones seek counseling and read up on how to help and cope with him. Soldiers are very adapt at masking their feelings. God Bless.
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