Posted on Jul 23, 2019
Cristian Nicoles
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Posted in these groups: First Army Div East
Edited >1 y ago
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Responses: 16
1SG Dennis Hicks
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Edited >1 y ago
I was 165-169 lbs and 5'10 when I joined at 17, it doesn't matter what the recruiter put on your paperwork your going to get measure and prodded constantly, if you have a health issue or don't meet standards they will find out. as for 100lbs in your ruck don't believe what you hear, its usually less than that and you will find that you will be able to carry more than you thought. I was and am a pretty scrawny fellow, no big bulging muscles no supper powers at all but I served 35 plus years, rucked hundreds of miles, jumped out of perfectly good aircraft and smashed my body in all sorts of government approved ways and in some non approved ways. DO NOT DROP out, do not quit and do not void your contract. All that BS about trying to get back in 6 months later is BS that they tell troops to keep them from having fits when they are dropped. Destroying your body is always a chance you take, but if your keep fit, eat right and have a strong will you will be fine and have a tons of fun bitching about your career, maybe even 20-25-30 years later. NEVER, EVER QUIT, once you do you will regret it and pay for it the rest of your life. Own your contract be the best that you can be and out perform your peers to the best of your ability.
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SGT Debra Jahnel
SGT Debra Jahnel
>1 y
I Agree Wholeheartedly - NEVER QUIT! I ETS"d before my second enlistment was up, because of age & health - had I kept fighting, the Army would have fixed the health problem & I could have stayed for 20. That decision kicks me in the head on a daily basis, now 30 years later.
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COL Job Seeker
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>1 y
I echo Top and the good Sarge. The only time I carried that much weight was in Ranger school and that was due to extra 60 ammo. They always love it when the big guy does that. What you have to learn in the military is that you have to have self believe and self fortitude that you will make it to the objective on top. That is when you find out your true left and right brothers and sisters that meet you up there too on top on that objective and on time. It is a mental thing and you will do fine. Trust yourself. Can someone help me out with how big Audie Murphy was, one of our greatest Infantrymen of all time, from the glorious 15th Inf Regt?
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SSG Assistant Station Commander
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If you meet the standards to ship out, then stick to your commitment. You joined for a reason. You won't be carrying 100lbs rucksack. Yes, there will be intense physical activity as an Infantryman, but you will endure. As far as earning a degree, go for it while you're on active duty. Not using the tuition assistance that is provided to you is foolish. I (personally) would strongly recommend that you stay committed and move forward. Here to help if you have questions.
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1SG 1st Sergeant
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While yes Infantry is hard on your body, you will not be "so obliterated" that you cant do anything else after. I've got 15 years in and been jumping out of planes the entire time, and there are plenty of people that have done than that. So calm down with the dramatic flair, you'll be fine. Just learn to take care of yourself, learn how to properly stretch and recover, how to take care of your feet, and how to take care of your body in extreme temperatures.
As far as you weight goes, you're young and still have bodily changes that need to happen. This will include gaining weight, no one stays the weight they were in high school. Keep doing what you are doing to gain healthy weight and have fun at basic.
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CSM Director
CSM (Join to see)
>1 y
I would have to agree with MSG Bradshaw. There are Soldiers who "obliterate" their body, but I think back and remember what we did as young private: drinking energy drinks, eating at fast-food places, non-stop smoking, alcohol weekends and still rallied for PT and FTX often times pushing our bodies to the limit non-stop. A good percentage of the non-combat related injuries I have seen were directly related to the Soldier not taking care of themselves. Who actually checks their ruck fit/sit prior to the 12 miler? If you are smart and strive to be healthy, you will be fine.
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