Posted on Apr 3, 2017
MAJ Operations Officer (Opso)
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It seems that everyone has something that signifies them as special or different from others such as the color beret, Stetson, buttons. How did this all start and why? Is it good to have or does it divide us between us and them....legs vs. Airborne?
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Responses: 138
SFC Bill Sakowski
48
48
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The one thing I liked about the Marine Corps was we didn't have all the badges and patches the Army has.
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CW3 Kevin Storm
CW3 Kevin Storm
4 y
CDR (Join to see) - The Army had the best uniform then got rid of it due to political pressure. The green uniform came about as a means of showing the US Army was not class system during the communist raise of the 1950's. The fact the Army took till the 1980's to do a total phase out showed how much the uniform was liked.
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LTC John Mohor
LTC John Mohor
>1 y
SGT Robert Armstrong nut in full dress with medals you. Have ribbons and unit award affixed above the right pocket right?
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SGT Ro Sapper
SGT Ro Sapper
2 y
Then why did you join the Army?
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Sgt Dale Briggs
Sgt Dale Briggs
9 mo
Always thought all the Boy Scout badges the Army Handed out were a bit much. Read a map get a badge, start a fire get a badge.
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PO3 Donald Murphy
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Submarine Dolphins are mandatory and essential. They show that you know how to fight the sub, save the sub, save your shipmates and save yourself. You know where the firefighting gear is and how to use it. You know how to get the damaged submarine to the surface. You know how to launch torpedos to defend the sub. You know how to stop flooding. You know how to breathe when the atmosphere is contaminated. You know how to drive the sub. And should all else fail, you know how to escape from the sub. Anyone on board a submarine NOT WEARING Dolphins has to be assigned someone to look after them as they do not know everything they need to know to survive.

Dolphins says that they do. So for that reason in the submarine community, Dolphins are essential. Anyone not wearing them is instantly noticed.
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MSG Michael McEleney
MSG Michael McEleney
4 y
Would you even be on a sub, if you weren’t already qualified?
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PO3 Donald Murphy
PO3 Donald Murphy
4 y
Yes. A third of the crew is non-qualified. Thats how they learn. Sub school is only basics as they don't know what class of sub you will eventually serve on. And even tho you are qualified on your sub, if your next sub is a different class, you will need to requalify.
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PO3 Donald Murphy
PO3 Donald Murphy
4 y
PO3 Bob McCord - Its been said that a submarine is more danger to its crew than to the enemy. Thresher is a good example. Sadly, the Cold War was ratcheting up and the last thing the government wanted to do was advertise that a builder (or two) screwed up the piping. An under the table witch-hunt commenced and soon, every sub was launched to a certain safety standard. I won't get into 1968's USS Scorpion as there are several schools of thought on how she went down. I think a few more higher up people need to die before the classifications can allow the info to be released.

As for the combat aspect, the training is tougher than it needs to be. And when the fit hits the shan, if you're where SONAR says you are, you're getting a torpedo that takes no prisoners. And sub-launched cruise missiles are 10 for 10 as far as shooting goes. One of our nav Chiefs was brown water Navy. You might have known him: Stephen Kollars. Crazy mo fo.
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PO3 Donald Murphy
PO3 Donald Murphy
4 y
Chief Kollars' Nam stories always involved him machine-gunning someone or something. He had the worst PTSD ever. You couldn't wake him up for watch without him grabbing you, reaching for a gun, etc. Of course, back in my day we didn't know what PTSD was and just referred to him as "crazy Chief Kollars."
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CPT(P) Miccc Student
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You know I used to say the same exact thing... Then I had a Commander that said he's been doing this for a long time and he's learned that people care about the little things. The Stetson and Spurs, coins, shirts... This job is rough. It's uncomfortable, stressful, forces you away from everything you love. So if it's a Stetson or a cord that gives Soldiers the motivation to do these jobs, then I say why not celebrate the mutual suck with those that suck the same as you. I believe it helps keep Soldiers coming back. It's human nature. We all want to be in the club. Even if it means we sleep in a Humber for two weeks haha
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SGT Eric Knutson
SGT Eric Knutson
>1 y
SPC (Join to see) - I believe that it was Napolean who said, a soldier will go that extra bit for a piece of ribbon to put on his shirt. I know I did not quote it exactly right, but that was the gist of what he was saying, so putting bling, or swag or whatever is something that has been around for a very long time. I do think maybe we put too much on, but then, looking at my own rack, I see a lot that were for different missions, or in the case of Desert Storm 4 different ribbons just for being there, but they were each from different country in the case of 3 of them, the 4th being Nat Def which I will admit I am more ambivalent about.
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SSG Jeffrey Monk
SSG Jeffrey Monk
>1 y
Its all about those who put a bit more effort into their jobs. Who would you follow, the sergeant who goes back to his room and prep for a night on the town, does the minimum through out the week to feel as though he earn his pay check or the guy who sacrificed months of his life to attend Ranger School? There was and is a reason why Airborne School is all voluntary.
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Maj Security Forces
Maj (Join to see)
4 y
The Stetson and Spurs, coins, shirts... I'm retired Air force but always thought these were so distinctive!
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Capt Christian D. Orr
Capt Christian D. Orr
4 y
As someone who proudly earned the blue beret as a both a USAF Security Forces enlisted troop and commissioned officer, I can affirm that the little things go a long way!
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