Posted on Dec 20, 2013
CW2 Electronics Missile Technician
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Posted in these groups: Imgres Physical Training
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SSG Robert Burns
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Your PT belt is a "load."
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SFC Senior Small Group Leader (Ssgl)
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Is that why I cant run......I should have known
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CW2 Joseph Evans
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Injury rates are higher when conducting PT under load.
So, Risk Management. You want to do a PRT session that involves IBA, do your risk assessment and submit it up the chain for exception to policy.
Outline your plan and program. Complete your Composite Risk management form.
Task - Conduct run under load
Identify Hazards - Damage to knees/stress fractures
Initial Risk level - II/B H
Develop controls - Graduated load over time/Increased distance over time per FM/restrict participation to 220+ APFT Soldiers   
Residual Risk - III/D L
Implement Controls - IBA w/ and w/o plates / 8-12 week training plan / pre-program APFT for PLT
Who/How Supervises - NCO PCI/Commander (training schedule approval)/1SG APFT

The policy is there for a reason, to prevent stupid from being stupid. A well thought out and organized plan will usually be granted an exception to policy, because it is no longer doing stupid just because its huah. Running a 5k with IBA is comparable to a shoothouse live fire. You don't do 1st day back from block leave...
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SSG Aircraft Powertrain Repairer
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8 y
Honestly I agree with you on this wimpy military but from a pre 2001 side I agree with the writer we train as we fight otherwise we are going to have a bunch of overburdened and physically undertrained Soldiers who will have to get out an XBOX or PlayStation Controller to accomplish any mission goals in a combat zone...I know you know what it felt like the first time you crossed that berm with all your crap on...  Soldiers now days bitch if they don't get an M4
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CSM Mike Maynard
CSM Mike Maynard
8 y
Chief, I agree that we have seen higher injury rates while doing PRT under load.

But, is that because Soldiers were improperly trained or that we increased the load/intensity to quickly?

A lot of units do road marches or similar activities with little regard to where the individual Soldier is at physically. Maybe you have a new Soldier who has never really rucked under those conditions and we just throw them in with everyone - that's usually when we get shin splits and other types of injuries.

The problem really is that we NCOs have not executed proper progression in some of our high intensity PRT which has caused injuries (that's why we have these kinds of policies). We need to have a "check-ride" or similar program that graduates folks from lower to higher intensity to reduce the propensity for injury while continually increasing the challenge/effort required of PRT.

25th ID, 8th Army and USFK have some great resources on their website on how to build a challenging and effective PRT program that is very intense, but is done smartly - mostly due to CSM Troxell and CSM Devens interest and focus.
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CW2 Joseph Evans
CW2 Joseph Evans
8 y
The difference between the days of old is at one point it was acceptable to get 50% across the berm while all the "broke dicks" stayed on Rear D nursing one injury or another.
The PRT and current policies is designed to keep the Soldiers healthy and whole so we can get 90% across capable of doing the job. These means well thought out plans that build and strengthen the entire team rather than weeding out the ones that "can't hang". We now train team resilience rather than using a "culling the herd" approach.
If you would rather break a Soldier that doesn't meet your expectations than train them to be a better, healthier, stronger Soldier, it might be time for you to consider another line of work.

CSM,
   You are correct. Improperly prepared, progression that occurs to quickly. There is a lot of sports medicine and science that is available to today's NCOs and leaders. Cycles of build, sustain, recover and reset that allows for continual growth. If you can instill the proper mind set and motivation with realistic attainable goals appropriate for the Soldier, given enough time, you can take nearly anyone and make them competitive with the best.
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CSM Mike Maynard
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FMs are guides, policies are directives/orders.

I would think that a Composite Risk Management was done and the Cdr determined that they wanted to mitigate a risk (injuries, overuse, etc).

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SSG Aircraft Powertrain Repairer
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8 y
CSM your right and only the Officers above us in charge sign off the CRM's.  So are we working with over worried leaders not ready to accept that risk or am I working with Leaders similar to the Days of PATTON.... You can Lead me Follow ME or get out of the Way...Leadership with guts and determination
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CSM Mike Maynard
CSM Mike Maynard
8 y
SSG Gorman - could it be that our officers don't trust NCOs to mitigate risk and implement control measures effectively?

If we NCOs actually executed CRM effectively, we could do just about any training we wanted.

We need to gain the trust of the officers so that they believe we can do CRM effectively so that we can increase our left and right limits.
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