Posted on Nov 5, 2014
PO3 Camille Romero
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What corrective action(s) should be taken where there is presumed bullying in the work place and EEO law cannot be applied (race, age, gender, religion, disability, etc.)?
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Responses: 3
CW5 Desk Officer
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Edited 7 y ago
In the military workplace, PO3 Camille Romero, this is a relatively easy answer: Use the chain of command, get leadership involved, address the issue.

In the corporate or completely civilian world, I would think the same approach might work: Get management involved, file a complaint with HR (?). Even if EEO law doesn't apply, there must be rules of conduct in the workplace, and it's up to management to enforce those rules and ensure people are not (in your example) bullied.

There's my two cents' worth of opinion on the subject.
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CW5 Desk Officer
CW5 (Join to see)
7 y
I can certainly see how a bully in the workplace would be difficult to deal with, even under the (otherwise) most supportive conditions.

If management/leadership is "in bed with" the bully, it must be just about untenable/impossible.
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PO1 Steven Kuhn
PO1 Steven Kuhn
7 y
PO3 Camille Romero bullies love to dominate and abuse their power. The more difficult you make it for them to bully you using the procedures mentioned by CW5 (Join to see) are a start. Doing you best and learning the job to such a degree where your value equals or excels that of the bully is another strategy. Standing with a group of valued people that have a grievance against this individual is also an option. One thing the truth has on its side is that it always finds a way to rise to the top. Also, bullies typically bully other people to make up for some inadequacy in their own lives. It makes them feel better. Knowledge is power, just use it responsibly. Bullies never stop until they lose more than they gain. Figure out a way to make it too difficult. Also, bullies love a response. They love to feel empowered by pushing your buttons. Keep a password on your buttons and they cannot be pushed.

R/

Steve
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PO3 Camille Romero
PO3 Camille Romero
7 y
CW5 Montgomery: You hit the nail on the head, Sir, with your comment:
"If management/leadership is "in bed with" the bully, it must be just about untenable/impossible."
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PO3 Camille Romero
PO3 Camille Romero
7 y
PO1 Steven Kuhn: Yes, I am aware that "bullies typically bully other people to make up for some inadequacy in their own lives". This is sick and sad. They should still be stopped.
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Billie Purvis
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Hello Camille, how are you?
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SGM Operations Sergeant
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First off TELL THEM to STOP second use your chain of command. Remember you are your first line of defence. If they don't know they are offending you then you are allowing the behavior.
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PO3 Camille Romero
PO3 Camille Romero
7 y
MSG William Frank, Fort Harrison, MT:
I understand telling the "bully" to stop, and making the chain of command aware; this is pretty common knowledge and relatively simple action to take. When this action has been exhausted, what to do now? (Please see CW5 Montgomery statement: "If management/leadership is "in bed with" the bully, it must be just about untenable/impossible.". I am looking for professional opinions/answers on how one might wisely, "smartly", handle that wily "bully" who is "in bed with" management!) -- Thank You! :)
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