Posted on Dec 27, 2013
CPT Operations Officer
2.26K
1
3
0
0
0
We all have those problem children in our ranks, but what moment of a soldier receiving any form of discipline stands out the most in your experience? Share whether it worked or not. Perhaps there are rather funny moments you might have had as well?
Posted in these groups: Discipline1 DisciplineAmerican flag soldiers Soldiers
Avatar feed
Responses: 3
CPT Public Affairs Officer
1
1
0
No S.... there I was. My first day as a PL. 

We had two Soldiers in my Platoon not show up for formation. Nobody can get ahold of them. Fast forward a few hours, we get word that they had been in a car wreck over night. The first thing is what do we do to take care of these Soldiers. As we are getting the story, we realize that these Soldiers had been out drinking (in direct violation of a command policy) and had wrecked into a bridge embunkment, and then ran from the scene on foot. 

They were both ok, outside of a few bruises. We requested that they come in immediately. Instead, they shacked up in a hotel room with more booze and some other party favors. Since we really could not go round them up. We sent a local PD to the room to interview them about the accident. We then started the paperwork process in motion. 

One was already on their way out of the Army. The other one received administrative action, but was allowed to be retained. 
(1)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small
SGM Retired
0
0
0
Edited 7 y ago
I'd like, if you don't mind, to relate a story from the opposite point of view. I had about 12 E-4's and E-5's who I could count on to do any job within their capability without supervision. Because promotions in the National Guard depend on there being an open slot as well as full MOS qualification, promotions in the Guard are very slow. This group was naturally feeling a bit picked on, and I needed them to be who they were, hard working and reliable. I asked them to come to my office as a group.

I told them, "When the commander comes to me and say he needs something done, I have only 3 options. I can do it myself. I can give it to someone and spend my time supervising. I can give it to one of you and know I can go about what I need to do without worrying that the job will be done. I'd like to be able to reward you or promote you for being the kind of soldiers I need, but I can't. All I can tell you is I know who the slugs are and who the superstars are. If I ever have a chance to put in a good word for you, I will. If I ever have a sham job come up, it's going to one of you, not to the slugs. If there's ever a school slot available, it goes to one of you, as long as one of you wants it. That's as much as I can do. That and my personal thanks and recognition of your efforts will have to be enough. I need people I can count on, and here you are.

Every one of those soldiers went out ready to continue to be overworked, because someone recognized their effort. Every leader should know to praise in public, punish in private, and remember that praise is what motivates the good soldiers. If all you have is the stick (no carrot) don't be surprised if all your soldiers need to be pushed.
(0)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small
SGM Retired
0
0
0
Edited 7 y ago
I spent most of my career in the National Guard. I became the 1st Sergeant of the headquarters company of a tank battalion, and (of course) one of my primary responsibilities was to inspect the area before COB on Sunday, round up the platoon sergeants, and tell them what they had missed.

I didn't really feel this was appropriate. After all, these are seasoned E-7's and E-6's and they know what right looks like. So one Sunday I did my inspection, made my notes, and said nothing at all. I held final formation at 1630, and dismissed the unit at 1700 EXCEPT platoon and section sergeants.

I had them follow me on my 45 minute tour of the area, pointing out everything that was not done. With them in tow, I returned to my office, picked up a report, and started reading. After a minute, I looked up and said, "Let me know when all that is done and we'll close up and go home." Needless to say, I never again had to go find them and tell them what needed to be done.

But the story goes on. I did get selected for Sergeant Major, and one of those platoon sergeants got the job after me. I saw him about a year later and he told me, "I really hated what you did to us, but just two months after I became 1SG, I had to do the same thing to my platoon and section sergeants. It was the best lesson I ever learned."
(0)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close