Posted on Oct 22, 2014
SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
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PO1 Disaster Survivor Assistance Specialist
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Looks like pretty common and simple tradecraft, otherwise known as spying. Soviets used to do it, Russians do it now. Chinese have been doing it for decades. Why is anyone surprised at this?
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SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
SGM (Join to see)
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Not surprised. When I see these things being released, I see them as someone sending a message or attempting to influence something or someone, such as we are not asleep at the wheel, we need more funds to be be watchful, etc.
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PO3 Jonathan Cooper
PO3 Jonathan Cooper
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Frankly, I'm sure stuff like this happens on a routine basis. All it takes is someone getting caught before we start changing procedures or security gets beefed up.
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Maj Chris Nelson
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interesting article. Looks like someone granted access and permissions that should not have been granted, so they need to assess that aspect also. Unless they prove that it was done for profit/espionoge etc, they may have a hard time pressing charges. Let's face it, if any one of us found we had access to something like that, would it not be interesting to learn something like that??!! I know I could find it interesting. And for me, it would only be Gee Whiz!! If it is something that really needs to be secured, then, maybe this info needs to be stored differently (SIPR?).
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SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
SGM (Join to see)
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MAJ Nelson, yes, scary.
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SPC Andrew Smith
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SGM,

Firstly, I would say a thorough investigation needs to be completed. Thorough, in this case, meaning they absolutely need to discover if this employee was acting on behalf of a foreign entity or not. It seems to be already determined that the employee did, in fact, commit the act, and punishment should hinge on the findings of the investigation.

If they can find no connection to China, or any other foreign entity, they should rule that the breech was due to either negligence, or incompetence on behalf of the employee/s, whom should certainly lose their jobs, in my opinion, and be punished in accordance with any laws that may govern this type of crime. However, should they find she specifically was attempting to aid a foreign entity, then the case would enter the realm of espionage, a completely different animal.

Either way, it appears that the government needs to better protect this sensitive information. Data pertaining to a critical part of our infrastructure should only be accessible to personnel whose positions require it, not to those who merely stumble upon it because it's there, and certainly not those who would use it for criminal purposes.
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