Posted on Jul 24, 2019
LT John Chang
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I've started working with Shift on a program to help folks leaving the military to get career training regardless of whether they have a degree. So, I want to start creating some content I wish was available when I got out - http://nominate.shift.org/johnchang
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Maj John Bell
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Civilians. An interviewer actually told me the fact that I changed assignments frequently told her that I was was unable to find a position in the military where I fit in. And the fact that I moved every 2 or 3 years told her that I could not even decide where I wanted to live.
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SFC Michael D.
SFC Michael D.
>1 y
My father was in for 23 and me for 20. Until I retired, I never lived in one place more than four years. I just moved to a new house and that was after being in the old one 26 years. 26 years! I couldn't believe the crap we accumulated. I loved moving around though. Got to see a lot of this would for free.
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Maj John Bell
Maj John Bell
>1 y
SFC Christopher Smith - I retired more than 50 miles from the nearest military base, Camp Grayling. A lot of soldiers never heard of it and say "Camp where...?" That vast majority of the veterans in this area (there aren't many) are one term enlistees and many of them are surprised by how often I changed billets or moved.

My impression is that Marine Officers are probably the gypsies of American servicemen. The longest time I spent at any post was 36 months, to the day. Most of my postings were closer to two years than three. I have a friend who is retired USAF. He did 23 years at three posts (one of those was a return posting). But 23 years with an average near six years between moves... wow!
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LT John Chang
LT John Chang
>1 y
Maj John Bell - SFC Michael D. During my 10 years I moved 7 times.. somehow I managed to actually buy a home in that time. But I once sat down and calculated that I spent not more than 3 months all together there before renting it out!
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Maj John Bell
Maj John Bell
>1 y
TSgt Joshua Duplin - I personally enjoyed the gypsy lifestyle. My wife and kids... not so much. The problem after getting out was that many, not all, civilians involved in the hiring process do not understand that in the military a high geographic and billet churn rate is the norm. It turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Even though I had good job offers, I decided to "hire" myself and went into business on my own.
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
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Edited >1 y ago
LT John Chang I was discharged in June 1972 and started working full time and going to school full time. I had to interview with three managers for a high paying job at a chemical plant. One of the managers did not like the military or veterans, and he let me know it by asking me if Vietnam had messed me up, and other challenging questions. I kept calm and was hired. In school, I encountered hostility from students who also did not like the military or veterans. Between school and work, I had little free time, so staying busy kept me focused on achieving my goals.
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LT John Chang
LT John Chang
>1 y
Wow, I can barely imagine what that was like!
On one hand it's a more PC world, where folks wouldn't think to say things like that. On the other it's just more insidious where they still think that way behind closed doors.
Let's hope that we can work towards more understanding, or at least a willingness for employers to listen and learn what veterans have to offer.
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SFC Michael D.
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Learning that civilians are not soldiers. The discipline levels will make you want to kill someone at first but resit the urge. Just like when you deployed, you have to acclimate. Go slow.
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LT John Chang
LT John Chang
>1 y
Amen - on resisting the urge! lol - Funny! In Chinese we say "go slow" instead of "have a good trip."
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