Posted on Apr 9, 2017
SPC Lead Security Officer
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A friend of mine has asked for help repairing a 1968 Buffalo Scout that used to belong to his father. It's not worth much, but it's sentimental.

After cocking the hammer the trigger will not engage.

I'm currently cleaning it, but I have little knowledge on repair and am seeking suggestions on where I could educate myself on the subject.
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Responses: 11
SGM Erik Marquez
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I'm a big believer in DIY

But understand your working on a firearm
A firearm that has limited to no parts availability should a mistake in repair happen
A firearm action is finiky and requires only specific and correct craftsmanship work be done if you want it to be safe and reliable post repair.
DYI refinish sure
DYI restock why not
DYI install replacement sights of course
DYI a known action component and or assyembly that was design, supported as a self install with common hand tools and great instructions ... sure
But inspect, repair an antique firearm action with no prior exsperance in general nor specific knoldge of the firearm in question
I'd suggest not, unless it is intended to be a non firing display piece only
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SPC Lead Security Officer
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I believe he would like to fire it again. Not all the time, but a once in awhile kind of thing. Currently I'm taking it apart and cleaning it the parts of dust and carbon. I'm hoping to find what's wrong with it, but before I start repairs or take it apart too far I want to learn more.
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Sgt Albert Castro
Sgt Albert Castro
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If you are Active Duty and stationed somewhere other than your home state, search for an NRA sponsored shooting range. Those folks can direct you to a certified Gunsmith there in town. An old rifle like your friends may not be repairable. My hunch is, if you cock the hammer and the trigger will not engage you have a problem with the trigger "sear". It may take a specialized Gunsmith to fabricate a new sear. Good luck Sir.
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SSG Robert Webster
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If this firearm is what I think it is; what you are dealing with is a 22LR Single Action Revolver. I have a similar revolver that had a problem like you describe. The problem was with the bolt/cylinder latch. The latch is made out of stamped metal and is easily bent.
What I would do is to go to the following web page and drill down to the firearm that you are looking for - https://www.gunpartscorp.com/ This is Numrich's website and is quite comprehensive and I have used it before and highly recommend checking them first.
Though with the description that you gave you could go ahead and skip ahead to the following webpage and check out the line drawing there. It can be used for disassembly, reassembly and parts verification. I would suggest printing it. https://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/FIE-33236/Revolvers-36171/E15-38043.htm?page=3
If my guess is correct you want drawing ID number 29 - part # 79120C - part name Bolt (a/k/a Cylinder Latch)
This is a simple swap out repair IF their is nothing else wrong with the firearm. You will want to look for excessive wear on the various parts and if there is any replace if possible. DO check the entire firearm before purchasing any part that is needed, because a part may not be available and then any other part that was purchased would not be worth the money or effort.
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SPC Lead Security Officer
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Greatly appreciated thank you
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LTC Public Affairs Officer
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If you insist on doing it yourself, with little knowledge of the weapon, start with Google and YouTube....both will have a wealth of information to get you started.
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SPC Lead Security Officer
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I'm not sure I'll be doing it myself yet Sir. I wouldn't mind finding out how though.
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