Posted on Aug 11, 2020
Jake Lang
48.7K
53
22
2
2
0
Hello RallyPoint, hope everyone is well. This is merely a comparison on the everyday life and jobs of both units. I aspire to enlist with as an infantry soldier soon as I am finished with my current degree program. As the title suggests, I'm asking for the specific details of the differences between two of the most distinguishable units in the Army (one in the Big Army and one in USASOC). I understand the 75th is a Special Ops unit with a very specific task (a job and position that many infantrymen dream of), but both units speak to me in what I would want to do in the Army. I also understand that just passing Airborne School doesn't guarantee me a spot in the 82nd, but from what I've heard on here and from a lot of other vets, it is the (overwhelmingly) most likely unit that I would be stationed with, just as well as that I understand that RASP is without a doubt the most difficult and trying 60+ days that I would go through if I chose that path.

Many consider the 82nd an already elite unit amongst other Army units with it's 18 hour deployable attribute (just like the Rangers), but they are still quite comparable to a line infantry/standard light infantry unit. The thought of slogging through a 25 mile ruck with the rest of your company, providing general forced entry into denied access areas, being the "tip of the spear" for general infantry, acting as the "hammer" during operations and the utmost amount of large-scale violence to the enemy, or just being out in the field during either exercise or deployment, all are what is attractive to me in my time in my future enlistment. Without a doubt, the 82nd has a reputation in it of itself.

With that said, the job of an Army Ranger also attracts me as well (again, I understand that many infantrymen dream of having a slot in this unit). We know what they generally do, large-scale direct action missions, they go kicking down the door of some HVT, and either cuff or plug him and get rid of his friends as well, or (back in the old days on rare occasions) they provide force-on-force security for other SOF units (Op. Gothic Serpent) or raiding a whole enemy encampment, or the occasional special recon mission. Again, a job that many infantrymen desire. They may be the "scalpel" during operations, but I love that the 75th still has the job and capabilities of an infantry unit. And without a doubt, their reputation far precedes them.

My inquiry today is mostly to refine my knowledge on both units' jobs (and perhaps their daily life during down-time or training) so I can make a better informed decision and to make sure that either one is truly a better decision for me. Both are Global Response Force units, both are "tip of the spear" units, both units have my most forefront attention.

My main questions here are:

1. What are your guys' impressions/thoughts on each other and each other's jobs? Is there anything that the 82nd provides that the 75th wouldn't mind having in their toolbox and of course what are the things that the 75th does that the 82nd would love to do for work as well, and is there anything that either of them do that I am not aware of, yet?

2. What is the daily life like compared to both the 82nd and 75th (both Tabbed & non-Tabbed)? How do each soldiers get along with the rest of their comrades in their units, etc.?

3. What is the overall general attitude of each unit? Are there more or less people that are not as motivated to be there? What is the RFS rate of both units?

4. Which unit is more likely to have an "us versus them" mentality (my apologies, but I just seem to see that a lot these days) or a laid-back attitude (not in their work, but in treating others outside of their unit) with other people? Sadly, personal experience along with stories from trusted friends (both vets and non-vets) with certain members/veterans of certain units have left me with a bad taste with them (I understand that is a "people/human/individual" thing in general, but I can't help but feel it more with - again - guys from certain units with their attitudes on things, still much respect and appreciation to those who serve, regardless).

5. What is life like after service for both units? Is there more camaraderie amongst veterans of either units that remain after you leave service?

Overall, I would be extremely honored if I had the privilege to serve under either units, but with that said, I plan to do just a one term contract (I made a promise to my fiancee [soon to be wife] that we would be back to continue our lives in our current professions). If there is something that I missed, please do let me know. I look forward to the wisdom that you all will hopefully provide. Once again, hope everyone is doing well.
Posted in these groups: 75th Ranger RGT4e71065c 82nd ABN
Avatar feed
Responses: 8
SFC Retention Operations Nco
16
16
0
You probably won't have the choice.

Just ask for Airborne in your contract. Volunteer for RASP while in Airborne school. You probably won't make it and that's ok. The 82nd is filled with people who failed RASP and it's still a great organization. If you make it through RASP, then great - you're a Ranger! If not you go to the 82nd and become a super duper Paratrooper and still get to make fun of Legs
(16)
Comment
(0)
SFC Retention Operations Nco
SFC (Join to see)
>1 y
Jake Lang the 75th is the greatest organization you could ever work for, if you have the grit to make it. Every week a potential recruit asks about Ranger School, or Rangers, or SFAS, SFQC, Green Berets, Green Platoon or something else they saw on Making the Cut. Statistically they won't make the cut.

But if you do, Sua Sponte
(1)
Reply
(0)
Jake Lang
Jake Lang
>1 y
Sergeant, I have no grand illusions of what it takes to stay in the Regiment, not just to make it in. That is why I question it so much and get as much info to help me make my decision, because I know chances are a bit against me, and I know myself well too. My mind complains to me every time I’m hurting or tired and I use humor as a means of escape (...or complaining, whichever one comes first). But I also follow the simple phrase of being “a cut above”. I myself also can’t believe how easy new recruits think it is to just be in one of these units. But with that scroll or tab, it wouldn’t just be pride in me, but fear of not being able to live up to the standards of those scroll or tab everyday. If I ever quit during RASP or Ranger School, I would not be able to look at myself in the mirror as I am a man that firmly believes in giving it your all and then some when doing things you care about. Those that believe they got it down just cause of some Discovery channel show are without a doubt disillusioned to a laughable state. Although I drool at the thought of being in a unit like the 82nd or 75th, I know my body would be in pain most (if not ALL) of the time and I would be hitting the rack every night more exhausted than the night before. But I would love knowing that nothing in my life from then on would measure up to it. I would love knowing that hose around me are a select few, not because of what they learn, but what they have deep down inside that separates us both from the rest. Again Sergeant, I have no grand illusion of how to get into either of these units. Blood and profuse sweat will be the cost, without a doubt, the extra danger associated with being in such a unit that causes me to warn my fiancée of me possibly not coming home one day that caused her to tear up for hours on end - weighed heavily on me. Still in the end, I can’t help but still want it. Thank you, Sergeant.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Jake Lang
Jake Lang
>1 y
Also, what are you talking about, Surviving the Cut was a great show, I got to enjoy watching the suffering of so many while completely dreading the fact that that might be me pretty soon.
(0)
Reply
(0)
SGT John Swift
SGT John Swift
1 y
AIRBORNE Sgt, was Airborne 50 years ago and very proud to have served.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
CSM Michael Chavaree
8
8
0
No comparison, life in the Regiment was pretty great. Life in Division was a joke. They are way behind on tactics/equipment/leadership. In my opinion they dont encourage free thinking mindset that SOF capitalizes on. I was not impressed with the 82nd.
(8)
Comment
(0)
Jake Lang
Jake Lang
>1 y
May I ask you to share stories of said examples, Sergeant Major?
(1)
Reply
(0)
CSM Michael Chavaree
CSM Michael Chavaree
>1 y
Sure, I talked to the Division CSM about equipment modernization and what they were doing to enhance capability. Nothing was the answer. I asked him who determines what kit you get issued. “CIF” was the answer. The Division is comprised of a bunch of leaders that only know life in the Division, therefore... nothing changes. I had issues from the first day with “measuring” contest with the Infantry. It was annoying and delayed progress. I was actually shocked that with my experience I wasn’t welcomed with a little more enthusiasm. From what I saw, they did not treat their junior enlisted very well. That is the horsepower of an organization and the future generation. An investment would be wise. My general impression was that the organization was cutthroat for no reason. Not sure about life at your level.. retention rates speak for themselves. Jake Lang
(3)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
SSG Roger Ayscue
6
6
0
I spent a total of nearly 15 years in the 82d Airborne Division. In my opinion it is without a doubt the best light infantry division in the world. The Troops and Leaders are top shelf. Everyone there is a volunteer and wants to be there. It is the only Forced Entry Capable unit of it's size in the world. Wheels up, anywhere in the world in 18 hours.
This being said, "Division" (There are many divisions in the US Army, but only the 82d is referred to and known Army wide as "Division") is a tough unit to be in, is on mission cyle often, and will be deployed more often than most units.
Those of us that had the honor to wear the "Double A" will tell you there are two units in the Army, outside of USASOC, Those two units are "Division and those units that wish they were Division"
Anyone that disagrees, Well....who listens to "Legs" anyway...All kidding aside, the 82d is a Great Unit, with a long history, pride in it's battalions and it sets the standard. You will not regret a tour at FOrt Bragg with the All Americans and you will for the rest of your life identify with and be part of the All American Division. Aside from the 2 years I spent in a Long Range Surveillance Company, the 15 years I was in Division was the best time of my life.
(6)
Comment
(0)
Jake Lang
Jake Lang
>1 y
Thank you for your input, Sergeant. The 82nd is arguably one of the most reputable units in the Big Army. Sadly though, I’ve heard a lot of flak from outside of this website from other vets that the 82nd has lost its “former glory” and that it is no longer the unit that it once was. I hope these statements bear little to no fruit as that would be a shame with the history that the 82nd has. May I ask what your thoughts are on that, Sergeant?
(0)
Reply
(0)
SSG Roger Ayscue
SSG Roger Ayscue
>1 y
Many veterans tend to think that it was better when I was there, it was harder when i went through, etc. There have been changes in the Division, and indeed the Army as well. Some of these changes I agree with and some I do not.
Regardless of what any of us say the decision is yours. Most of the changes in the Division were also changes to Big Army as a whole.
I still think that there are great reasons to serve in the Division. Either way, Ranger Regiment of the Division you have to decide what direction YOU want to take your service.
First I want to thank you for having the desire to get up on a wall that so many of us have come down off of because we are just too old to do it anymore. Second, you have chosen serious units. I would recommend that at some point you serve in the 82d. It was the best Division sized unit on Earth. The Rangers are a way of life and it will test you to the limits of your endurance. If you want Small unit, Special Ops the Rangers are for you. If you want to be part of the best Division in the world, it is the 82d AIRBORNE Division. Either way you will be part of units that the old vets will have your back, you will be part of a brotherhood that dates back to World War Two and has never had the shine beaten off the armor.
My battalion for the second and longest tour I did in Division was famous for Operation Market Garden and was the first US Unit to defeat the Germans during the Battle of the Bulge. We had never lost an inch of ground in peace or wartime. Both units are full of Pride and Esprit. AIRBORNE...All the Way!
SGM (Join to see) SFC Laurie Emmer CPT Fiona Peden SSG Robert Webster MSG (Join to see) Jake Lang LTC Natalie Vines
(2)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close