Posted on Oct 21, 2016
SGT Infantryman
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I still have over a year left on my current contract but I'm looking to possibly reclass into CMF 35. Can anyone give me advice on the process and what to expect in either of the MOS transition courses?
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1LT S1
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Depends what you're looking for. I feel that 35G can lead to a lot more potential civilian careers than 35F, but 35F is likely a better route if your goal is to be a CSM or CW5.

The thing about being a 35F and then looking to land a private sector intelligence job is that you do not have a hard skill. You will get your TS/SCI with anything 35 series. You will get amazing experiences as long as you are in an MI BN (or higher) with either MOS. What you will not get from 35F is a hard skill. As an all-source analyst you will be responsible for producing and briefing products made from all of the 35 series. This is a good soft skill set for a career in the military, but it is not as strong of a resume bullet. Anything else 35 series has a hard skill to list on their resume, along with the clearance, experience, and training.

I loved my time as a 35F at the MNC-I C2 level, but as an S-2 it isn't quite so glamorous. A 35G will never be in an S-2, and a 35G will have a very easy time making an amazing salary after they separate, while a 35F will have an easier time climbing the ladder in the Army. Choose your path wisely based on your personal goals. For me, 35F was a decent starting MOS to become a solid 79R, and then the combination made me a well rounded NCO prior to commissioning.
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SGT Infantryman
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I appreciate your knowledge Sir. right now I'm considering possibly staying in and going Warrant later on down the road. I realize that my current MOS has no real application outside of the Army, and finding a career that can provide me with a solid foundation after I leave is high on my priority list right now. Could you possibly shed some light on what the day to day duties of either one would be without violating OPSEC of course?
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1LT S1
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Probably best to let the current analysts talk their experience. I only spent my initial four years on active duty as a 35F, and then a couple in an S-2 with the Reserve. The biggest thing I would say about that job is that it greatly varies depending on where you are stationed, and you will never become an expert at everything it entails. Not only do the assignments vary in what you are researching, but the tools vary greatly as well (at least it appeared that way in 2006 to me). Your focus will be vastly different depending on what Major Command you support.

A lot of what I did at the Corps G2/C2 level was research, report writing, and presentations. A highlight for me was having the opportunity to create and brief products designed for GEN (then LTG) Odierno when I was a SPC. The junior 35F Soldiers get a lot of face time with higher, and their words hold meaning to echelon's well above their level if they are good at what they are doing. In contrast, most of the other 35 series MOS's (to include 35G in discussion) are more behind the scenes and more technical.

But like I said before, if you are in an S-2 it's a lot less glamorous. Working as a 35F in a combat unit you'll primarily do things like route/threat analysis if deployed, or mostly process security clearances if stateside.
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PV2 Geospatial Intelligence Imagery Analyst
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I'm currently in the 35G course over here in Ft. Huachuca.
Of course you need a TS Clearance, a decent ASVAB score, and some patience.
It's a 24 week AIT, with 3 phases.
They've upped the game with some new learning materials, which doesn't make it an easy course. You'll have to be some kind of a good briefer, but as I hear in the main Army you'll typically have the foxes do that stuff for you.
I've got less than 3 weeks until graduation, and what I can say from the process is that there's a steep learning curve between phases, and there's typically a lot of pressure in making products fast, being able to cram and remember everything within your 6 months here, and be a reliable source for the GEOINT community.
PT standards aren't too bad, but between Foxes, Tangos and Golfs (the 3 mos's within the 305th MI BN) Golfs have the rough edge of it, yet it isn't as bad as I imagine a combat mos to be.
Training shouldn't be any problem compared to what you'll get after you mosQ. You'll learn much more after AIT, and get a lot more notoriety.
At the same time, your goal and mine might be a bit different. I'm trying to put in my 8 years and possibly get out to be in the NGA or something of the like.
As a Fox, they like to say they steal our promotions, but that's foreground work. A 14 week course with little to actually learn if you're going to be a mosT (as far as I can tell).
I say that for the education you should get that Golf contract, but I'm biased.
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SSG(P) Patient Service Tech
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I'm sorry, but I have to say something about that beret.

DA PAM 670-1: (2) Wear. The beret is worn so that the headband (edge binding) is straight across the forehead, 1 inch above the eyebrows. The flash is positioned over the left eye, and the excess materials is draped over to the right ear, extending to at least the top of the ear, and no lower than the middle of the ear.

I get that you Airborne guys stationed at Bragg like to do your own thing, but seriously wrong is wrong.

And yes, I know I'm a dirty leg.
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SSG J33
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It's an accepted tradition.
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