Posted on Jan 16, 2016
SPC Department Supervisor
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I'm preparing my Army Service Uniform for my wedding later this year and have noticed a difference in service striped in various pictures- the regular, two inch service stripes, and the large, ceremonial service/overseas stripes. What does the reg say? I couldn't seem to pinpoint anything in 670-1...
(see photos for examples)
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Responses: 16
SGM Steve Wettstein
11
11
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The larger stripes (in the center of the picture) are on the old dress blue uniform and are now only worn on the mess dress.
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SGM Robin Johnson
SGM Robin Johnson
4 y
"Dress blues and tennis shoes" or "Dress blues, tennis shoes, and a light coat of oil" used to mean getting dressed up, or sometimes used to refer to those who never seemed to get their hands dirty (as in 'the folks at HQ in dress blues and tennis shoes'). It was also sometimes used when asked what the uniform was, or if you were told to be somewhere it could be equivalent to 'with bells on' or just added emphasis to the order for everyone to be there looking sharp. Yeah, I'm old. I came in in Feb 1980 serving in all MTOE units - still plenty of Vietnam vets and we had a LOT of colorful phrases. Heard this more from the Marines working near us though.
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SFC Ron Gitzendanner
SFC Ron Gitzendanner
4 y
SGM Robin Johnson - Thanks, SGM Johnson! Great description and oh what
memories. Another old one comes to mind...have to clean it up a tad for here...."F&%$ 'em all but 10...6 pallbearers, 2 road guards, 1 counting cadence, and 1 carrying the Guidon"!!! The only 10 really important people in your life...LOL!! Hey, you aren't "old"...my first enlistment was in 1963 (to 1966), then an 8 year break, then 22 years in active reserve. When I went back in, I told myself that the first thing that pissed me off, I would be instantly history. Years later I told my friends..."It's amazing what you put up with, when you know you don't have to be there". Truth is, I really enjoyed it, had a lot of fun along with all the work, and felt like I really did contribute something, as little as it was. Whats that old saying?..."I wouldn't do it again for a million bucks, BUT I wouldn't take a million bucks for what I did". Thanks again, and Good Luck to you....AND thank YOU for your service!!!!!!
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SGM Robin Johnson
SGM Robin Johnson
4 y
Thank you for yours as well!
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SSG Richard Hackwith
SSG Richard Hackwith
4 y
SGM Robin Johnson - I remember one from the 60s, "C**t cap and shower shoes and right shoulder wall locker",
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MSG Military Police
7
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Sorry this is bugging me... Your question is valid and this is not directed towards your question, my OCD kicked in with the pictures, when wearing a Bo tie for a formal event such as a wedding, dinning in or out, no headgear is worn and no DUI (distinctive unit insignias) on the lapels which the SSG is clearly wearing. Not sure if others share the same thought but I know this was ingrained in my brain since day one as well as being supported by AR and DA-PAM 670-1. Also the SFC with the belt and sword, I haven't found it yet in the reg but I'm almost positive that if you are the groom, you do not carry this item while wearing the mess uniform unless actually performing equivalent of a security detail, arch with swords, etc in which case he should be wearing headgear and a regular tie. I have never seen it this way therefore it looks weird to me.
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SPC Department Supervisor
SPC (Join to see)
4 y
MSG (Join to see) Thanks for the reply! I agree with your statements fully! I trust you understand why I was so confused to begin with!!! As for the regulations, they don't really contain much information about the NCO's Sabre or the ceremonial belt. I can't tell you how much research I've done in the past few weeks looking for the specific regulation, to no avail!
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1SG David Spalding
1SG David Spalding
4 y
I'm guessing the SFC in the pic is the groom, and he is wearing the 'old' dress blues (therefore the large stripes). As far as the belt and sword, correct - they should not be worn with the mess uniform, but he is not wearing the mess uniform. The no headgear rule is not for just formal events. It is for 'evening' formal events. I was NCOIC of the Honor Guard for my brigade for quite a few years and was trained by the 'Old Guard' in DC. We did a ton of dining-outs, weddings and other formal and informal events. When it comes to weddings, we stuck with the wishes of the couple being married (headgear, no headgear, sabre, bow tie, four-in-hand, etc) as long as the uniform faithfully represented the values and traditions of the Army.
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CW3 Aviation Safety Officer
CW3 (Join to see)
4 y
The only place you'll find any information about the sword or saber is TC 3-21.5, but it is largely centered around the Drill and Ceremony movement and very little regarding the actual wear of the sword. There are no Army regs that discuss which uniforms you can or cannot wear the sword with (that I'm aware of). That is usually covered by SOP, but more than likely unless you're assigned to an honor guard your SOP won't touch on it. The one constant is that if you are wearing the sword or saber then you are "under arms" and should be wearing headgear, regardless of the uniform you're in.
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SGT (Other / Not listed)
SGT (Join to see)
>1 y
MSG (Join to see) I wore greens once or twice in my day, and I don’t recall ever wearing DUIs on my lapels. The SSG isn’t, either. It looks like he’s wearing a US insignia and Branch insignia, as he should be.
I also don’t recall removing those from my jacket for formal events.
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1SG Drill Sergeant
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SPC (Join to see) - the wide stripes you refer to are worn with the OLD "Dress Blue" jacket. The shorter, overseas and service stripes are worn with the NEW ASU.
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SPC Department Supervisor
SPC (Join to see)
4 y
Thank you 1SG (Join to see) ! I appreciate your reply!
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1SG Drill Sergeant
1SG (Join to see)
4 y
SPC (Join to see) - Let's keep this simple. I think better that way
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