Posted on Dec 10, 2017
CPT Gurinder (Gene) Rana
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Fighting against his poor and negligent leadership, on each and every step of his assignment, in almost a decade and a half of active service, an officer was errantly discharged to cover-up the mistakes of his leadership, clear thru to GOs. Fighting the system; this officer was diagnosed with PTSD. Was this diagnosis another cover-up or can PTSD develop in peacetime?
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SGM Erik Marquez
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The problem many have with stories like this, is they understand the shear number of disinterested parties that have nothing to gain and every thing to loose in such a purported wide spread collusion, it seems impossible to see it as real..Add to that, most times, like here we have but one side of the story, and third party told at that.
So is such a story possible? Yes, as anything is possible, its just most things are unlikely.

Are some susceptible to Post traumatic Stress disorder from non combat trauma? Yes
Has a person, or group gone to great lengths to cover up or discredit someone? Absolutely, and it almost always comes crashing down, because of my very first point. " shear number of disinterested parties that have nothing to gain and every thing to loose in such a purported wide spread collusion"
Eventually, the lie comes apart when someone, just one is no longer willing to further the lie, not even to ignore it.
There is no such thing as a secret..Only a truth that has not yet been told. The only perfect secret is when it is known only to one, and that one person dies having never told, written, emailed, phone called another.

Do people who jump behind a single, third party story often find them selfs later wishing they had not, when "The Rest Of The Story" comes out? Yes, all too often.

With the current administration there is no better time to have your comrade (what an interesting choice of terms) to come forward and seek justice. If it is as you say "the evidence proves that all the information provided by the service was totally false and that the service had eliminated my comrade to cover-up the mistakes within."
It should be a slam dunk case, the media will eat it up, a public trial will no doubt agree totally with your comrades evidence that proves that all the information provided by the service was totally false and that the service had eliminated my comrade to cover-up the mistakes. That is after what happens when there is such evidence.
Being vindicated will likely go a long way in your comrades recovery,,or at least certainly cant hurt I would think.. If it is the false allegations that caused the PTSD, having those allegations proven false by the "totally false" information your comrade now has evidence of...
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SSG Public Affairs Broadcast Specialist
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1. I don't need to justify anything, the Army regulations tell us all we need to know. DENYING AT and field IDTs to MND Soldiers, WITHOUT input from their medical treatment team, for the COMMANDERS to decide whether the Soldier should go or not.. is how EVERYONE ELSE does it.. BY REG. Only CA issued a blanket denial. 2. What kind of SGM puts the burden of proof on a whistleblower, instead of looking up the information and SUPPORTING the fight, themselves? 3. No, our JAG allowed multiple violations of AR. It stands now, only partially after my IG complaint, what's needed is for big Army to get involved. That GO retired, but he's still in a position of authority as assistant TAG (I think). (Next question, how does a retired civilian CSMR stay in command of Soldiers which at least seems to violate AR 600-20 para 1-5a.).. Try to remember the Army is largely a moral and ethical organization.. so regardless of the source, immoral and unethical decisions made by generals or otherwise, are still wrong, and if they also violate AR, or law, they're unlawful, and we have a responsibility to resist.
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SGM Erik Marquez
SGM Erik Marquez
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SSG (Join to see) - Best of luck...
I think you will find what you think you know is not what reality is
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SSG Public Affairs Broadcast Specialist
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Very true.. I'm finding Army Regulations only exist to show proof they couldn't possibly do something, after they've done it... Like yellow lines on the road.. They don't stop a driver from going over them.. and it takes a cop seeing it, to have any hope of justice... and that's where I am now.
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SGT (Other / Not listed)
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SSG (Join to see) - what guidance in AR 40-501 are you referring to?
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SFC (Other / Not listed)
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Yes, PTSD is well documented outside of combat situations. It is also well documented as a non-permanent disorder.
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AN Eric Lewis
AN Eric Lewis
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SFC (Join to see) - Please cite your, "modern science disagrees," sources. I'm betting there are just as many sources who disagree with your sources. It is a very controversial issue. I asked some psychologists about it and they said it is one of the most contested issues in modern psychology.
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AN Eric Lewis
AN Eric Lewis
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SFC (Join to see) - Resorting to bullying or degrading tactics in a conversation doesn't prove your point to be right. In this case, it actually brings doubt to the premise you are supporting by making you appear less intelligent, though we know from your previous statements that you are not. I bring you this free bit of advice from a social media communications class I used to teach to my peers. No one appreciates the bullying comments.
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AN Eric Lewis
AN Eric Lewis
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SPC Edwin Savoy - God bless you, too, Mr. Savoy. If it wasn't for Jesus, I wouldn't be here now and, as you so well put it, we're all just waiting on our final orders. :-)
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SP5 Michael Cates
SP5 Michael Cates
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I second Lewis!
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CW5 Ivan Murdock
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PTSD is overdiagnosed - just like ADD ADHD we have allowed our medical field to look at the causes and fail to teach coping mechanisms, look at the current events another young shooter filled with drugs. It is a culture of big pharma in the name of helping us giving these drugs and a culture of acceptance. We have to make sure that you fill the narrative that everyone has PTSD, now it is almost a stigma for our returning soldiers. I served 35 years and saw lots of combat. With that lots of things that just part of the job. I currently am a full-time student getting another Grad degree, I talk to young soldiers all the time on campus, they are in school telling me about their rating and their benefits. I almost always have to ask what caused it, but it does lose some of its shine when I hear "we had a mortarman who had a tube blow up, so every time I fired a mortar I kept waiting for it to blow up" He now is receiving PTSD as a disability. He never saw it, and it never happened to him. There is a point where it would be a temporary issue, but we damage these young men and women by crippling them for a lifetime. There are real cases and they should be given EVERY treatment available but they are clouded by the large numbers of those who have learned the system and have a financial reason to simply never get better. Maybe temporary adjustments and re-evaluations would be part of a system to help our veterans, again care vs. a check. Combat isn't necessary at all, 1st responders, hospital workers, and many others are subjected to trauma. But we can cripple our soldiers by letting this be used for a lifetime. The care is available for a lifetime, but if they would take away the disability rating for most cases after an adjustment period they would empower these young heroes more often than not. I will share, that I do know what PTSD is, my father was a WW2 POW and I saw a man at almost 70 years old that you still couldn't touch when he was asleep, he masked it with booze for a decade and 2 divorces. When he finally met my mom and time had passed he was able to live the rest of his life normally. I never saw the effects but his ability to tell the stories and recover was inspiring. Personally, I had a daughter killed in a car accident, I was at the scene that night and identified her and my daughter in law. I see her in my mind almost every day in the back of the ambulance but we have to learn to cope. I was offered things to help (drugs) and I chose running and cycling to get myself where I could sleep. We need to engage and help our young soldiers, but we need to be honest too, we have allowed our political correctness in our society stop us from a little tough love. I liked to use the "Buck" example from the Band of Brothers mini-series. After diagnosed with combat fatigue he was treated and sent back, he returned after WW2 to prosecute the Robert Kennedy murderer and served on the California Court of Appeals as a judge.
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CW5 Ivan Murdock
CW5 Ivan Murdock
1 mo
PFC Donnie Harold Harris - No one labeled you at all
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
1 mo
CW5 Ivan Murdock - As I stated above, I think my Father and those other WWII vets recognized that they and their fellow soldiers and airmen were drastically changed by the experience. My impression was that it was about letting it rule your life after you returned. I have pointed out that there was a difference in how they returned from the war. It was over three months after VJ day before my father got stateside, but even the ones that come back directly still were out of combat for 30 days or longer before they hit stateside instead of clearing post and flying home after only a couple of days out of the jungle. Still, Dad wasn't the only vet that had that attitude.
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CW5 Ivan Murdock
CW5 Ivan Murdock
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CPT Lawrence Cable - They don't wait anymore, or during the height of OIF/OEF - I deployed dozens of times and conducted combat missions hours before getting on a plane to return home more than once.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
1 mo
CW5 Ivan Murdock - They haven't since Vietnam. There is more than a little evidence that the time to "decompress" before entering back into the civilian world was a big part of reducing the effects of PTSD. I know that the Marine were trying a program that brought a unit back and segregated them for some time period before releasing them back to the civilian world. Haven't seen any real critique of that program and I don't know if they still follow it.
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