Posted on Jul 14, 2016
CW3 Dylan E. Raymond, PHR
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Responses: 16
SSgt Melissa Gaitan
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The great struggle was learning how to be a civilian mentally. Civilians don't have the same mind set about being a team. Everyone works as individuals and they don't worry about how what they do affects the future and the people around them. Civilians in my experience are selfish individuals who work very hard for their money and have no problem in stepping on everyone around them to get there. I went straight into the Oil & Gas industry in Texas and it was easy because I knew how to multi-task and I knew how to not only be a leader but a team member. To sum it up, I was able to adapt to my surroundings but at the end of the day I was not only mentally but physically exhausted. Civilians frustrate me to levels not even my non english speaking Corporal ever got me to. I accept any challenge that I'm faced with but its not easy when you deal with Civilians who have no discipline. #mindovermatter #filteralwayson
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SrA Sheri Wooldridge
SrA Sheri Wooldridge
6 y
I still can't be civ. I've tried very hard. My brain won't lemme. I have PTSD and I flashback a lot so I feel I am stuck.
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SSgt Dwight Deatherage
SSgt Dwight Deatherage
3 y
Are you getting help? Don’t try to get thru this alone.
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SGT Jmajik Jmann
SGT Jmajik Jmann
3 y
SrA Sheri Wooldridge - SrA Wooldridge: SSG Deatherage has a very critical point. I went through the PTSD process while I was still working at the Miami VA after I ETS'd in 1992. The Gulf
War---Grenada and even stuff from my childhood I thought I'd dealt with kept coming up at times, whether it was in some of my flashbacks---dreams or misdirected anger at people---places---things---situations or circumstances however, I got the help I needed from various Departments at the VA and Civilian Hospitals. Not to say I'm perfect yet, I'm at peace within myself with a lot of those issues. The alone syndrome---nobody understands because their not a Veteran, etc. etc. etc.; does come into play at different points in life once we take the uniform off but, if you ever decide to get out of the Reserve Component, get the needed help for YOU because the benefits of being at peace with YOU is greater than anything on earth. Thank you for reaching out; that's the first start in the healing process.........
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PO1 John Miller
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Surprisingly my biggest struggle was learning how to dress like a civilian. I already had a place to live and was lucky enough to find a job while I was still on terminal leave.
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CW3 Dylan E. Raymond, PHR
CW3 Dylan E. Raymond, PHR
6 y
That is how you want to do it while you are still getting a pay check
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Cpl Justin Goolsby
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My greatest struggle was finding employment in a timely manner. My 2nd child was due to be born right before my EAS, so finding employment and a place to settle down in was of the utmost importance.
To mitigate that struggle, I made myself extremely flexible even so far as looking for jobs in neighboring states. Once I landed a job, I had a basic location to start searching for housing. Once I landed a place to live, I started moving stuff back and forth. By the time my daughter was born, I was already settled.
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