Posted on Jun 16, 2019
Ryan Callahan
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https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sgb-a-possible-breakthrough-treatment-for-ptsd-60-minutes-2019-06-16/

Just watched 60 minutes about a new procedure called stellate ganglion block, or SGB. The Army's clinical trial is currently under peer review.
Edited 3 y ago
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1SG Claims Assistant
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One can only hope it is an effective treatment, but I am extremely skeptical of any treatment that alters brain chemistry. Sometimes such treatments cause more problems than the condition they are treating.
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Capt Daniel Goodman
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3196975/

This is the original US paper, so far as I know, by Eugene Lipov, MD, in Chicago, an anesthesiologist doing pain management, so far as I know, his was the research, derived from a European Scandinavian country, through I think their military, on the technique, there's nothing new to it except where it's applied, when I was a doctoral allied health resident at a VA hospital, I was taught to do it for sciatica by one of my attendings, the only difference here is to apply a local anesthetic mix of lidocaine and/or marcaine, I bekieve, to the stellar ganglion, to decrease pain soasm, likely of candidate origin, possibly, or at least related, causing a flattening of affect and mood, described as chasing psychological flashback imagery in color to black and white, or so paraohrased, I've researched it quite extensively, the technique is essentially the same, though the area of application was of course novel, there's another recent thread on here where I discuss the whole thing relative to a device called the Calmare.nociceptive pain scrambler, as well.as.the festival aspect, in considerably more depth...I really was trained to do it at for peripheral nerve pain at a VA hospital yrs ago long before SGB was looked into for PTSD, just as I'd said, honest....
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Capt Daniel Goodman
Capt Daniel Goodman
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And if you notice, you'll see the paper here also used radiofrequency (RF) ablation in concert with it, which those I trained under also use for peripheral nerve pain, as do numerous other anesthesiologists who do pain management, I tried explaining how I was trained to do it back then to one once treating my wife, he was a young kid, and have me a somewhat dismissive, more than slightly derisive look about it all, however, he was quite young, and thought he knew what he was talking about, as such techniques are often used with a steroid block, whereas the object of SGB is specifically to avoid steroid accompaniment, to allow repetition, if needed, though I gather that's rarely reqd, apparently, whereas I and others did need to repeat such methodology fairly frequently for sciatica, trust me, the principle is basically exactly the same, honest....
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SGT Postal Clerk
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I have read extensive research and it is promising in many ways and also can make it possible for someone to obtain therapy after this procedure that makes them more receptive to what adjustments there are and the benefits. The initial studies have been great but the industry has a long history of pushing potential without sufficient historical data. There is also that key phrase "no apparent side effects..." in the short term maybe not but they have no long term data to back that up. It is a step in the right direction that will hopefully be very successful.
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