Posted on Apr 14, 2015
SFC Stephen Hester
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We live the Army Values when in uniform but do we keep them when we leave the service or just toss them into the corner with our boots? How have the Army Values influenced you in your post-Army career? Brothers and sisters from the other services feel free to discuss your values codes as well
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Responses: 4
SFC Douglas Duckett
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I believe there are a couple of factors when considering whether or not military values are used in the civilian sector.
1. How long did one serve. This is important because the longer a person serves, the more ‘ingrained’ military values become within that person.
2. What generation is the individual from? It appears to me, the older a person is, the more aligned his/her values are with traditional values (military).
I see too many veterans today who show up of social media doing stupid stuff that do demonstrate proper military values. Too many Veterans throw away their values in support of popularity and demonstrate a lack of what we were taught. They also forget that we Veterans have been through much more adversity, tragedy, or challenges than many of our civilian counterparts.
The Seven Army Values
1. Loyalty - Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. constitution, the Army, and other soldiers.
Be loyal to the nation and its heritage.

This does not mean you cannot disagree with what the government is doing, but you should not follow blindly either.

2. Duty - Fulfill your obligations. Accept responsibility for your own actions and those entrusted to your care. Find opportunities to improve oneself for the good of the group.
Many Veterans forget that one aspect of duty is to you. In my line of work, I see many Veterans who forget this; they give up on life and the pursuit of happiness.

3. Respect - Rely upon the golden rule. How we consider others reflects upon each of us, both personally and as a professional organization.
Many of the younger Veterans want respect, but forget they need to earn it in order to get it. We should all respect one another for civility reason, but anything beyond that is earned, not given.

4. Selfless Service - Put the welfare of the nation, the Army, and your subordinates before your own. Selfless service leads to organizational teamwork and encompasses discipline, self-control and faith in the system.
Even though duty entails oneself, it is not all about you. Giving to the community, family, or for the greater good is a cornerstone in measuring one’s self-worth. This is especially true when you leave the service, it gives a meaning to that person and supports the greater good.



5. Honor - Live up to all the Army values.
It is not enough to be well-intentioned; one must strive to put those intentions into action in a capable way. One must consider the effect his actions will have on others. Looked at like this, to persist in ignorance is itself dishonorable. (Andrew Cohen)

6. Integrity - Do what is right, legally and morally. Be willing to do what is right even when no one is looking.
This goes along with honor. People should not be deceitful; they should tell the truth when completing employment applications and resumes.

7. Personal Courage - Our ability to face fear, danger, or adversity, both physical and moral courage.
Veterans need to be able to overcome challenges, they did it before. I often see Veterans who just give up, they want things done for them.
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CPT Bob Moore
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I am in a leadership position in the civilian world. Everything I learned in the military about leadership applies.

I still use the Army Principles of Leadership when I mentor younger leaders. They can all be adapted for a civilian leader.
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SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
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Yes, they are the foundation of many positive issues of our culture.
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