Posted on May 7, 2015
SPC Nodal Network Systems Operators/Maintainer
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I am transitioning out of the Army very soon and trying to weigh my options. I am married w 3 children. Would like to utilize my education benefits, but need some advice about what avenues I should pursue so that I can go back to school full time and still have enough to support my family while doing so. Has anyone out there done the scholarships and grants, lived only off of GI Bill or gone out and tried to juggle a career and full time school? What advice, if any, might you all have?
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Responses: 11
CPT Bob Moore
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I went to school full time after I left active duty. I was also working full time when I went to school for both my bachelors and masters degrees.

The best thing to do is look for a school (and job, if possible) that fits what you want to do. For me, it was a school that was on quarters so that the sessions did not drag on too long. 10 weeks was long enough to get the material but not so long between breaks that there was a significant negative impact on my family. When I went back for my MBA, it was an online program at a state university. I was only taking 9 hours per semester, but that is considered full time for graduate programs.

The best advice I can give you is talk to your wife and kids if they are old enough. Make sure they understand and support what you are getting ready to do. It isn't easy working full time and going to school full time with or without the responsibilities of having a family. For me, it was worth it and has paid off.
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SPC David S.
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I went to school at night - both undergrad and masters degrees. I worked full time, and my wife had a baby during all of this as well. I would ask yourself if your educational goals are required in your professional growth. For me the answer was yes so I did what it took to get'er done. There are a lot of good programs out there. Do your research in your area with the local schools. I was able to get an additional 25% off for a DD-214. As far as loans I would try the night approach and avoid racking up any debt and work while going to school. It will suck, I know I did it for 2 years for my undergrad and then again 18 months for my masters. However in the end it was worth it. Regardless of my advice good luck in your academic endeavors.
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LTC John Shaw
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SPC (Join to see) You may want to look at the KYNG or whatever state you are moving back to. They will pay tuition and provide other benefits.
Also, you can pursue ROTC with a guaranteed Reserve/NG option, this provides a scholarship that guarantee for a Reserve slot. Downside is no active duty if you want this.

If you want to get out and never see Army again, then GI Bill for a full-time student with BHA for E-5 should be enough for all states except the coastal areas.

I would pursue the best school for the area you are settling and for the subject matter you wish to study. Focus on schools that have internship and placement programs.

If you plan to stay in KY, WKU, UofL, EKU have excellent Veteran assistance programs. I don't know UofK programs, but I am sure they are fine as well.
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CPT Bob Moore
CPT Bob Moore
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LTC John Shaw , you are correct. There are a lot of great schools in Kentucky that support the military and veterans.

Morehead State in KY is also a great option.

SPC (Join to see) , if you are staying in Kentucky, let me know. I will help out if I can.

Another thing you need to do is find out if the schools you are interesting in have a veterans\military affairs office. Most of the schools in Kentucky do and they are a huge help.
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