Posted on Aug 16, 2014
Capt Gardea Christian
1
1
0
Hello to everyone.
I am working on a guide that will benefit veterans transitioning to the employment path. It will be aimed at those with 10 years or less service; however, it can be utilized by all. I am looking for the successes and the failures or lesser successes of those who have transitioned to any form of civilian employment. I will create a step by step guide that helps veterans transition to civilian employment. The guide will include a generic timeline. The intention of the guide is to provide a visual example of what right looks like and what right does not look like. I will also have an advice and tip section.
As a recently transitioned veteran, I know there are a number of good resources in the transition classes, the internet, and forums such as these. I want to provide as much of this information in one place so crucial information does not get missed or gets realized when it is too late.
If you are interested in providing assistance, please comment on the discussion. I am looking for advice and tips that you wish you had known, that you used, and that you did not use but wish you had. I have been getting good information from veterans across all services. I appreciate your assistance in advance.
Avatar feed
Responses: 2
Capt Byron Chen
3
3
0
I think that veterans should consider taking action at least one year before their transition. There are many things to think about and learn that take time, including networking and informational interviews. I would also suggest taking advantage of the following:

1. You can submit for VA Disability Compensation up to 180 days before discharge. This not only gets you a jump start on the process, but the processing times tend to be shorter. I received mine approximately 8 months after EAS.

http://www.benefits.va.gov/predischarge/

2. Take your GMAT or GRE before leaving active duty and have the military (through DANTES) pay for it. These are $250 dollar tests that you need for graduate school. I think you should do this regardless of whether or not you plan on applying for school. The scores are good for most schools for up to 5 years. That means that you have a backup plan if you have trouble finding work and decide to return to school. The process takes time and you need to budget some study time (if you so chose), a time to take the test, and a month or so to complete the backend paperwork to get your refund.

http://www.military.com/education/timesaving-programs/gre-and-gmat-reimbursement.html
(3)
Comment
(0)
Capt Gardea Christian
Capt Gardea Christian
8 y
Byron,

Thank you again.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
Lt Col Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Program Manager
0
0
0
Capt Christian - check out this site. It seems to have great info and a mentorship program.
(0)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close