Posted on Mar 11, 2015
Capt Brandon Charters
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This news piece below talks to a study that has begun to connect the genetic dots of PTSD. It starts off with a pretty stunning statement:

“Among 10 people that are deploying to war, we could understand who is more, and who is less vulnerable to PTSD, and can develop preventions accordingly.” - Caroline Nievergelt, PhD, of the University of San Diego, School of Medicine.

I suggest giving this a read and forming your own opinion on how we would potentially handle mobilizing forces in the future knowing there is a possible genetic connection to PTSD.

How would this be handled when entering the military? I could see it eventually being tested for on initial physicals and being a part of everyone's medical records. In command for a day, what would you do with those troops that are more likely to have PTSD?
Posted in these groups: Screen shot 2015 03 15 at 2.13.20 pm PTSDMedical Science
Edited 7 y ago
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SGT Kevin Gardner
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I don't know, honestly these studies tend to be designed to push a specific medical outcome. In the early 70s all these doctors came out and said that baby's born prematurely would never have their brains develop properly or to the right size, it was not till late in the 90s they discovered that every child born prematurely brain was fully developed by the age of 8 months old, another study stated that people who have a homosexual parent will also be genetically disposed to be homosexual, now having a father who happens to be homosexual I can attest to the fact I don't feel those same urges, also happens that I have a couple of friends who's fathers are also homosexual and having discussed this study with them they concur that again that is another bunk study.
There is another study that stated drug addiction is also genetic, well my moms a pill popping addict again not something I suffer from, in fact I won't even take the crap the VA gives me.
As far as PTSD I grew up in a home so twisted that me my brothers and my sister should have suffered something bad from PTSD, however after my combat tour I found that I do have PTSD, and I found writing helps me with that, yes it's still a struggle to be out in public in crowds and always having intrusive thoughts, but it is manageable.
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SPC David Stephenson
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This was the premise of the movie Gattaca. There is a lot of research pointing to the telomere length. These protective caps on the ends of our chromosomes play an important role in our overall health. Each time a cell divides these guys lose a little bit in length. I bet there is a correlation between telomere length and interferons as a result of the effects on the body due to the shorter telomeres. The good news is there is some promising research in how to lenghten the telomeres. Also more importantly this might lead to not necessary a cure but a form of treatment for PTSD.

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2015/01/telomere-extension-turns-back-aging-clock-in-cultured-cells.html

http://www.ta65doctor.com/blog/2014/07/19/telomere-shortening-war-veterans-ptsd/
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LCDR Rabbah Rona Matlow
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This is actually a very scary idea. Genetic profiling, in individual cases, such as to see if a woman has the BRCA 1 or 2 gene, is appropriate.

But this type of genetic profiling would result in preventing people from deploying, essentially ending their careers. As more of our personal information is taken out of the private sphere to the internet, and as Big Insurance continues to get bigger, this kind of thing must be prevented.

Remember George Orwell; Big Brother really is watching...

1LT (Join to see)
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Capt Brandon Charters
Capt Brandon Charters
7 y
Interesting way to think about this. I hadn't thought about the genetic profiling & loss of personal information side of things. I originally thought this could be a unique way to help prevent some cases of PTSD. There are so many external effects to knowing this data, that it would be very hard to implement with a currently serving and fighting force.
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LCDR Rabbah Rona Matlow
LCDR Rabbah Rona Matlow
7 y
Capt Brandon Charters If genetic profiling could accurately predict such things, it would be helpful. The thing is there is no guarantee of success, with a huge down side...
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PFC Sandra Wade
PFC Sandra Wade
4 y
The test can tell you if the medication you are taking is effective or clearly a NO GO! and detrimental to your PTSD / Depression symptoms. Ran into an active duty patient in the study/ tested. Came back CAN NOT TAKE WELLBUTRIN .. The patient was suicidal. So off that medicine and on to another that would be helpful. I have posted more about this Under the original post.
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