Posted on Aug 25, 2019
SPC Ted Ronayne
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I'm ignorant on this matter because I'm in AIT and haven't held a rifle or executed a movement since basic training. I received basic radio training here but nowhere near what I need to be proficient. How can I train on my warrior tasks (shoot, move, communicate) when I graduate AIT?

I want to try and earn the expert soldier badge when it is rolled out in October, and from what I've read, it will be best to show up already proficient in such tasks.

It is also my understanding that such proficiency is important in the future for advancement and schools. I want to be able to fulfill such expectations.

Lastly but most importantly, I see it as my responsibility to develop such proficiency. I take the soldiers creed to heart, and the line that I am "trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills." Yet, I am nowhere near proficient and I find that I am lacking as a soldier because of it.

How should I go about developing such skills? Can I ask to train with a combat arms unit when they do such related training? Are there schools that develop and build such proficiency? Do units do such training often? How can I go about training on my own? I want to be an asset in whatever role I fill, not a liability...

Any advice is appreciated!
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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From one Reservist to another, I can tell you that maintaining those WTDs to earn the Expert Soldier Badge is going to be extremely difficult. Speak with your NCOs and your Training NCO to see what you can do to improve those skills. It could be something as simple as you conducting classes on WTDs to the other Soldiers in your unit. But, bear in mind that this WILL depend on what is already on the Training Schedule for your unit. As for training with another unit, you can certainly ask to RST with another unit that is focusing on WTDs for that weekend. But, you need to get permission from each unit before you arrive. As for training on your own, you can certainly do that. At least, as much as you can in regards to specific equipment that you won't have access to when not at BTA. Again, get with your NCOs and your Training NCO to see what they think and what y'all can come up with
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SPC Ted Ronayne
SPC Ted Ronayne
3 y
Thank you SSG, I'll keep that in mind when I get back to my unit! I know being a reservist will make my goal hard. However I am going to be trying to drop my DD368 for active duty as soon as I finish college.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
MAJ (Join to see)
3 y
I concur with SSG(P) Livingston. Weekend drills are usually filled with administration events and classroom training. You would be a step ahead if you memorized the Task, Conditions, and Standards for each task.
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SGT Carl Blas
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You'll get proficient PFC Ronayne, as time goes on, in basic Roy Pace never shot a firearm in his life, but shot 1st place making me 2nd place, all Roy said was, "He followed everything that he was instructed to do".
You have your mind set in the right place, and I can tell you'll be up there with what ever you'll do in the Army.
In the Guam police department for years, I always shot first place in the law-enforcement competitions. When asked, "How do I shoot so good", the answer, "Have fun and enjoy the shooting", the clock or time always make the shooter to edgy and miss.
When I was CQB training with SEAL team-1, they have a saying, "Smooth is Fast", so take a few more seconds to place your round on target, after that, you'll notice your time was fast. Some might shoot faster then you, but they miss their target, what's the use.
Also, getting proficient with your weapon, also means getting proficient with working with your unit as a team.
You're young and will get there, enjoy the time you spend with what you're doing at the time, "Time Fly's".
"All the Way, Airborne!"
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SGT Carl Blas
SGT Carl Blas
3 y
SPC Ted Ronayne - I was young too once, and didn't have the patience too.
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SPC Ted Ronayne
SPC Ted Ronayne
3 y
SGT Carl Blas Like you said, such is human nature.
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SPC Jeffrey Swanson
SPC Jeffrey Swanson
3 y
B97ca19
AATW
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SGT Carl Blas
SGT Carl Blas
3 y
A369c543
SPC Jeffrey Swanson - Looks almost the same 25 years apart.
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SSG Intel Nco
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Well I commend you on wanting to improve. However this time during AIT you should focus on learning and being proficient in your MOS.

Once you get to your first unit and get settled in you will then be going to some ranges for the shooting aspect. However it is tough to "easily" get the movement training depending on what unit you go to with being a 35F.

Like you even offered yourself though, mingle with people in your barracks and at work and find others who are good at those things, or want to learn too, and then practice on your own time.

Once you've been at your unit for a bit and get wet behind the ears then you can (with the blessing of your CoC) coordinate and host training on these matters. That not only gets other trained, but also looks good in showing the initiative and drive to better yourself and others.
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SPC Ted Ronayne
SPC Ted Ronayne
3 y
Thank you SSG! I'll be sure to keep my head in the present here at AIT, like you said, it's time for me to learn my MOS.

I'll keep that in mind when I reach my unit though. I'll be looking for those around me who can help me improve.
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