Posted on Jun 7, 2016
SFC Michael Woody
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I would like to know how the transition process can help to better selection of new careers, education, and civilian transition. What should the process look like? How were you treated? This is important because I believe the military unemployment rate is decreasing, but the UNDEREMPLOYMENT rate is increasing. There is a disconnect and the advocacy Veterans need is lacking.
Edited 8 y ago
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PVT Amos A.
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Edited 8 y ago
I think it might boil down to veterans helping each other. And I dont necessarily mean for profit. A lot of guys are trying to make money doing this, but I think there has to be some inner desire to help, teach, mentor etc.....all the things that made you a meaningful NCO to begin with (if thats what you were).

I was dumped. I got tore up in a training accident of all things, and was lucky to survive according to my Doctors. I was left to fend for myself. Nobody at my unit knew about INCAP. I got no guidance from anyone at the local level or state. I was tossed out like trash. And almost lost everything. If I wasnt a mean son of a bitch, if I wasnt a previous healthcare provider who knew how to navigate that system, and if I wasnt a decorated combat veteran who knew my juniors were watching, I might not have made it.

Selection of careers has to begin with desire and passion. Thats half the battle. I dont know if any process that can better that. Obviously we can have Joes take tests etc but they have to decide for themselves and that process needs to begin well before they ETS. If they get hurt thats another story but hopefully they were already looking towards that day well before an injury process.

If you dont have a meaningful skill that transitions to the civilian sector (and even if you do) I suggest going to college. Theres really no other way. Possibly vocational school of you want to get into a career like HVAC.

I mentored one of my teammates to become a nurse. Thats what I did before I joined the Army so I guess he figured if a knuckle dragger like me could do it so could he. He was right.

Im trying to get one of my other juniors to go to college for web design or something like that since he has a part-time job working with websites. All he has to learn is some HTML etc and he can play around more on the front end, and make some coin.

If you have Chap33 you can get BAH benefit as well and rock out with your **** out. If you are rated 20% or above by the VA you can get Chap31 and BAH and charlie mike. This way Joes can leave the mil and go right into school. They might have to get some BS survival job until bebfits kick in. If they are a family provider things can be a bit more complicated during that transition but it can be made to work. Thats what I did and Im supporting 5 live bodies besides myself. SO it can be done.

Otherwise, its off to the turkey factory like one of my peers chose, unfortunately. Im still trying to get him to go to college for criminal justice or police science but I dont think he believes he can do it.

Or he cant visualize it somehow. I think visualization is everything.

Bottom line is, I think vets need to help vets. Im not sure the military can actually do more than they are. And how much SHOULD they be doing for us? We are adults after all. Many of us are leaders. We need to help each other. At the national level is cool. Im glad people are speaking out. But many of us need to do this at the local level. And start reaching out to veterans in the local community around us.

Perhaps we can talk to units in the area. Create nonprofits. Gather volunteers. Talk to VSOs etc and give them our number to be a resource. Mentor vets through the process. Kick them in the ass every now and then. Theyre familiar with that so I dont think anyone will get too butt hurt.

But I think we need to do it for each other. We took care of each other while we were in. And that was special. We had a unit identity. Perhaps a ship identity. Outside the military its a little more difficult. We dont know each other. Guys come from other branches or occupational specialties. The language might be a little different.

But its still about each other. Its still taking care of each other. And if we dont do it we are going to fade out of the public eye. And when the public is no longer looking at us, benefits and sources of assistance are going to get cut. So we need to help each other. And fight for each other.

And remain a community.
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SPC Troy Garcia
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Maybe if leadership would let soldiers ACAP (or whatever the ETS transition is called) and quit picking on them the last few months. Let guys start applying for jobs, getting school situated, let them figure out living situations. If there was a company that walked us through ETS-ing
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SPC Troy Garcia
SPC Troy Garcia
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The way they walked us through reception, that would be grand.
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MSgt Eric Roseberry
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Managing expectations is critical. Frequently military experience does not necessarily translate well into a civilian resume. Did you obtain the educational credentials to match your leadership experience? What type of employment will you be looking for, have you made an effort to discuss prospects with civilians working that job now.. how about their bosses?
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