Posted on Aug 18, 2020
CPT Advisor
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I have to make a decision on direct commissioning into the National Guard as a 66P Family Nurse Practitioner in the next few weeks. I'm weighing all the options and trying to gain a better understanding of the National Guard officer life. I'm well-versed on enlisted promotions, but how do officer promotions (specifically specialty branch officers) work in the National Guard?
Edited 8 mo ago
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MAJ Brigade Nurse
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Promotions can work two ways. If you sit in a position of higher rank, say 1LT in a CPT slot, the state can choose to vacancy promote you in that slot. This type of promotion is very rare and usually the position is a critical position. The most common is the federal board process. This is based on time in grade. You are notified that you are in the zone for the board and you get your ORB and iperms up to date. The bird convenes in DC. It takes 3-4 months for the board results to be published. If you make the list, your unit is to recommend you for promotion, it goes up through the TAG and then to the Governor. This takes about 3-4 months. Your date of rank is when the Governor approves, not the board publishing date (which is the case for the Reserves since it is federal). You also have to be sitting in a position for that rank. Medical is a little different, you can promote 1 grade above your paragraph line number.
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8 mo
MAJ (Join to see) Thank you very much for the thorough explanation! Does it become more difficult in the NG to find slots as you get to the O4/O5 level?
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MAJ Brigade Nurse
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8 mo
Not necessarily. Most medical provider slots are for O4/O5. And if not, medical can promote 1 over.
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MAJ Ronnie Reams
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A friend of mine was in the NCArNG. Started as a CPT, MC and every 3 or 4 years he was promoted and in 12 years was a COL, MC. Never promoted again and retired as Colonel.
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