Posted on Feb 19, 2018
Lucas Lerner
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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Of course not. Garey Busey would clearly be a member of the Chiefs Mess, not an Officer...
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PO1 Brian Austin
PO1 Brian Austin
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LMAO!
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SFC David Reid, M.S, PHR, SHRM-CP, DTM
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I dont think so,,,,,,
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
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Edited 4 y ago
Lucas Lerner No. Movies like Under Siege, Rambo, etc., are for entertainment only.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
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SN Miguel V. - Missed the point completely there sailor. In the original book, Rambo is a psychotic that killed dozens of people, including Teasle, and Trautman blows his head off with a shotgun.
The portrayal in Rambo and Deerhunter of PTSD blows and just give credence to the Hollywood inspired notion that Military personnel with PTSD are wife beaters and violent just waiting to go off.
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SN Miguel V.
SN Miguel V.
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But you gotta remember.....it's Hollywood and they're gonna do what's best to bring in the money CPT Lawrence Cable so I'm not disagreeing but Rambo not being the hero I can see that as well....didn't say he was....but however slanted Hollywood portrayed it at least the message was put out there (through Rambo) that these guys came home with serious issues and NO ONE DID A DAMN THING FOR THEM....as far as wife beaters and violent yes there were some....not all obviously but there were some who were....and much of that stemmed from having no one around who could comprehend the issues they were struggling with and no medical help available to help them at the time....so many resorted to violent mood swings, alcohol abuse, wife beating, and worst of all drug use which then either got them arrested or put 6 feet under....all because the resources they needed were not there....instead they were spit on, called baby killers, and more....I'm not a Vietnam Vet but I've met many during my time in the Navy ('78-'82) and in civilian life....my wife's brother-in-law is one and became an alcoholic for many years till she put her foot down one day and told him either quit the booze or I'm outta here.....he's been sober for many years now and they just made 48 years of marriage together.....I only served 4 years but I'm a softy for all my brothers/sisters in arms....I will do anything I can to help a fellow vet before anyone else....stay well my fellow vet.....
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
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SN Miguel V. - I was in the last group to have a real draft card, they just didn't draft out of my year. I know dozens of Vietnam Era vets, from my buddy Bob, my college roommate, my brother in law and more since I enlisted 1982. I ran with a guy that joined the Marines and was an Embassy Guard when Siagon fell. Yes, they were not treated well when they come back and while I never saw the abuses that were rumored to have happened, what did happen was they were ignored and that was probably worse. I don't buy PTSD as the cause for wife beating or being a violent drunk. If you did those things, you were probably doing them before you joined. The same goes for a lot of the drug and alcohol abuse. Remember that the standards for entry into the Service during the era were almost non existent. I volunteered with a vet intervention group for awhile and I never felt any of those involved were violent, generally just the opposite. Any kind of stress or conflict sent them into anxiety attacks and they walked around like they had just mainlined 3 gallons of Starbucks coffee. That's why I object to portrays of violence supposedly linked to Post Traumatic Stress.
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SN Miguel V.
SN Miguel V.
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CPT Lawrence Cable - I don't buy PTSD as the cause for wife beating or being a violent drunk. = PTSD isn't the cause but with alcohol/drug abuse it gets exacerbated and when that happened instead of providing them with assistance or help they were cast aside. Or arrested and locked up which made the situation worse. Not all turned out this way but some did. Considering the way they were treated it's no wonder they chose to deal with it in the manner they did. Alcohol and drugs numbed them to the pain of rejection society cast upon them. I'm sure you may have heard that as the reason some did it during the meetings at some of the intervention groups you volunteered at.
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