Posted on Jan 16, 2015
SPC Combat Engineer
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So myself and other veterans on campus are trying to setup a program to prevent sexual assault on both males and females by creating a "safe walk home program". I am also looking for effective ways in which we as veterans can change our public image and serve the community. If anyone has any suggestions or thoughts it would be much appreciated. Thanks
Posted in these groups: Images9sh3pvxo Sexual Assault
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Responses: 10
Capt Richard P.
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Get involved with organizations that promote responsible consumption of alcohol and positive relationships and conversations about consent. Most sexual assault occurs where the attacker and victim know each other and often involve alcohol.
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CPT Gary Wilkins
CPT Gary Wilkins
7 y
I do not often comment, but I have to say that this is very true Capt Porter, based on my past experience; I have gone through all the SHARP and TARP training as a government civilian employee. And, as a young Lieutenant, I was involved as the main witness in the court martial of a soldier for "attempted rape and oral sodomy." (Both individuals apparently knew each other.) The officer victim was decidedly drunk at the time... (bad judgement on her part, though she at least had the foresight to have a female friend drive her home to the BOQ from the 'right arm' night at the O-club); the accused was sentenced to 10 years at Leavenworth--and this was 1982--the old school days). At any rate, the major contributors to assaults, in my opinion, are (1) alcohol, which lowers inhibitions and devastates an individual's ability to exercise good judgement (and young US soldiers seem to think getting 'totally wasted' is the thing to do, unlike young Europeans or Japanese who, having grown up with access to alcohol from a younger age, in general seem to have a much better appreciation of the sensibility of moderate drinking than most Americans do; I have to put up with latrines where explosive shitters (likely due to excessive alcohol consumption) like to gum up the works--but that's a different story), and (2) the fact that the US media is always objectifying women primarily as sex objects--but a change to that would require a really fundamental cultural shift that will be a hell of a long time coming. Likely the more possible cultural alteration would be in redirecting drinking habits--that would at least lessen the number of sexual assaults where alcohol is the significant contributing factor.
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SGM Operations Sergeant Major
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I concur. Alcohol is nearly always a factor. When I was stationed in Guam, out of 19 incidents, alcohol factored into 17 according to the Master Chief who was briefing the audience. I would also recommend pubic or group settings and avoid isolating oneself in a dorm room or a barracks room. The Army's current focus is to avoid victim blaming and to encourage bystanders to speak up or intervene. Changing societal attitudes take time.
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CW5 Desk Officer
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Edited 7 y ago
That's a great way to improve the image of veterans, SPC (Join to see)! I like TSgt Joshua Copeland's suggestion to escort in pairs.

When I was attending evening classes at the University of Maryland back in the early 90s, I often escorted my professor/advisor to her car after class. It's sad that we live in a society where it's not safe for a woman (or a man, for that matter) to walk on a college campus without fearing they might be mugged or worse.

Kudos to you for this effort!
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TSgt Joshua Copeland
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Always do it in pairs and if possible mixed gender (one male, one female escorting a third).
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CPT Gary Wilkins
CPT Gary Wilkins
7 y
A very wise idea, MSgt! Good to check on it with the unit JAG personnel also, I suspect.
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