Posted on Jan 30, 2016
CPO Andy Carrillo, MS
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REPORT: WASHINGTON
Gavin B. Atchak’s commanding officer...ordered him to avoid unprotected sex after Atchak tested positive for HIV in 2011. The officer also directed Atchak, an enlisted man....to inform future sex partners that he carried the virus that can cause AIDS. Atchak disobeyed and engaged in unprotected oral and anal sex with...http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/crime/article57147868.html
Posted in these groups: Images9sh3pvxo Sexual AssaultUcmj UCMJImgres Law
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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Edited 6 y ago
That IS a crime actually....
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CPT Military Police
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CPO Andy Carrillo, MS Knowingly having unprotected sex without informing your partner if you have HIV is a crime. (Criminal transmission of HIV).
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SSgt Terry P.
SSgt Terry P.
6 y
CPT (Join to see) My thoughts exactly.
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PO1 Pete Sikes
PO1 Pete Sikes
6 y
Where is the Statute?
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1SG Claims Assistant
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At issue is that this Airman was given an order that he did not follow. Legal gymnastics around aggravated assault aside, disobeying a lawful order is punishable under UCMJ. And there would have been a lot of counts.
Morally, this Airman's behavior is reprehensible. Not informing sexual partners that you have an infectious disease that if contracted will likely result in their death is not acceptable. He did it purposely so that he could continue to enjoy an active sex life without regard to the health and safety of his partners.
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CPO Andy Carrillo, MS
CPO Andy Carrillo, MS
6 y
1SG (Join to see) therein lies the conundrum--their 'private' condition and criminal conduct puts others in mortal danger. I support publishing such lists so that everyone is equally warned not to have unprotected sex with the infected person, which is what a trial has effectively done anyway.
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1SG Claims Assistant
1SG (Join to see)
6 y
CPO Andy Carrillo, MS - The difference is that a trial discloses what an infected person has done criminally, while publishing a list of HIV-positive individuals stigmatizes what they MIGHT do.
There is a very big difference.
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CPO Andy Carrillo, MS
CPO Andy Carrillo, MS
6 y
I see it as protecting society from what others are known to and have already done--disregard the lives of others, as you articulated earlier. Does one's privacy trump the risk to the lives of many? I think not. Great discussion, BTW...thanks for sharing.
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SPC Eric Cunningham
SPC Eric Cunningham
6 y
Yes, it does. Rights, from privacy to the right to bear arms to the right to free speech extend as far as the actions are not used for harm. You cannot strip that right simply because of the POSSIBILITY that they may use it to harm people. If that were the case, we can strip litterally any right from anybody for any reason. This is the United States of America - we do due process and have a system built around punishing those who choose to do harm and only those people.
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