Posted on Aug 13, 2014
PO3 Account Management Specialist
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The discussion about whether or not FB was allowed at work got my wheels spinning last night but I wasn't quite sure how to say what I wanted to regarding the change in our younger generation, how they operate, etc. Well, this email came in today from a leadership book club I did at work recently, and it's got some BIG key points on it: #4 and #7 stuck out at me, specifically regarding social media at work, etc.

It's easy to blow off the younger generation as dumb and ignorant because of the technology/social media, but there is so much value they bring to the table that the "old farts"(for lack of a better term) wouldn't think of. I've heard stories about how a boss will pose a question at a business meeting, and a young 20-something intern will post on social media and get a bunch of different responses back that eventually lead to a solution they otherwise would have never considered.

In other words - don't write it off so quickly just because it's unfamiliar territory. I admit, I work with young college kids in my work, and as a volunteer, and it annoys me when they type in text speak or don't have the sense to at least put an appropriate subject line in the email, but I guess the best I can do in that regard is lead by example.
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Cpl Software Engineer
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Any "leader" who passes the buck to their subordinates when they make poor decisions is a huge mistake. The quickest way to poor performance of a team is to have a "leader" who isn't respected.

The second biggest mistake is for upper management to side with a "leader" who created a team with poor performance. It irritates me to see people get promoted who have done nothing but create a hostile work environment.
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SGT Matt Windsor
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My problem with Facebook (and I'm an IT specialist, by the way, so I'm not at ALL opposed to it) is much more practical.

The Army used to be vehemently opposed to Facebook, and then right after I became a civil service employee in 2010, they suddenly reversed course.

I am not even kidding a little bit when I say that probably 90% of *ALL* bandwidth utilization on the network I help administrate is taken by either Facebook or one of its ad agencies.
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PO1 Disaster Survivor Assistance Specialist
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And you wondered WHY the military didn't want to let FB in the system? GEEEESH...even an OLD FART like me can figure that one out......
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CPO Ars/Fod Lcpo
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I honestly think that when leadership puts value on the generation gap and leadership styles and skills, it's a simple dismissal of the true problem and looking for the easy answer. There is no "New Navy" and the problem lies with people not able or willing to conform to regulations and the times. Facebook is just a small symptom in a larger problem of weak leadship in working with people. True leadership shines when despite those gaps in knowledge and exerience you overcome, teach and get people to think on the same page as you.
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