Posted on Sep 5, 2015
SPC Jan Allbright, M.Sc., R.S.
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I believe that the Triple CMB is the most rare of the Army awards. There are exactly two recipients of this award and I have excerpted their stories from the Army's official page (link at bottom). I hope you enjoy the read.
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July 31st 1943, Technician Fifth Grade Henry Jenkins leaped to his feet and ran to within 25 yards of the Japanese positions.
With the help of the two other Soldiers, they retrieved a wounded Soldier, returned back across the open terrain and moved him to a place of relative safety.
Henry then started treating the Soldier's wounds.
He would remain with the Soldier throughout the night until he could be safely evacuated the following morning.

On 1 May 1945 Private First Class Wayne Slagel voluntarily moved forward under heavy Japanese machine gun and mortar fire to administer aid to the wounded men and moved them to safety.
Again and again he moved about exposed to the heavy concentration of fire and his actions undoubtedly saved many lives.

For their actions, Technician Fifth Grade Henry Jenkins earned the Silver Star and PFC Wayne Slagel would earn the Bronze Star for valor.
Both Soldiers would receive the newly authorized Combat Medical Badge.


On 2 November 1950 near Pungwan, Korea,Sergeant Jenkins' courage and supreme devotion to duty was displayed time after time, as he refused to be evacuated in spite of his painful wound and continued to administer to the wounded, not only of his platoon, but of those in the second platoon as well.
Seven hours after he was wounded, Sergeant Jenkins was found suffering from loss of blood.
Only after he was so ordered would he allow himself to be evacuated to the battalion aid station where he was further evacuated to the rear.

SGT Wayne Slagel was assigned to the 27th Infantry Regiment (Wolfhounds), 25th Infantry Division in Korea. He joined them on Heartbreak Ridge.
One particularly frigid morning mortars fired by the Koreans and their Chinese counterparts started pounding the Wolfhounds.
The cry for medic could be heard up and down the line as havoc prevailed.
With his oversized medical aid bag, SGT Slagel started treating his wounded comrades as the punishing rounds exploded all around him.
He would move from casualty to casualty with complete disregard for his own safety.
Slagel later stated that this day was not much different than many others during his time in Korea.

For their actions in Korea, SGT Jenkins would receive his second Silver Star and SGT Slagel would earn his third Bronze Star.
Both men would earn their second Combat Medical Badges for their roles in Korea.

Late 1965 found Sergeant First Class Jenkins landing in Vietnam with the 28th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division.
The unit moved to Phuoc Vinh, Vietnam and started carving out their future base camp.
On more than one occasion, mortar fire crashed into the base camp destroying portions of the infrastructure, killing and wounding many.
Henry rushed to treat all the wounded along with the other medics.
Henry reported that these attacks were regular, but were not attempts to overrun the base, but instead to harass its occupants.

In Vietnam, SFC Slagel was assigned to his old unit, the Wolfhounds, and was the NCOIC of the 2nd Brigade dispensary.
On 1 Feb 1968, mortar rounds started landing all over the camp.
Then the rockets started.
In the chaos that ensued, the cry of “Medic!” was heard throughout the camp.
The TET Offensive had begun in earnest. Luckily for many, SFC Slagel still had his oversized medical bag and he treated as many wounded as he could.
He had been wounded in the hand, leg and knee by an exploding mortar shell, but continued treating the wounded ignoring his own wounds.
He made his way to the battalion aid station and continued to treat the wounded.
When he had provided all of the medical aid that he could, he allowed himself to be treated.

The CMB was reintroduced on 2 March 1961 and both Slagel and Jenkins received their third award of the Combat Medical Badge for service in Vietnam.

http://ameddregiment.amedd.army.mil/heraldic/triple.html
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Responses: 13
SGT Michael Jenkins
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My father is MSG. Henry L. Jenkins (pictured). One of only two to be recognized and documented as triple CMB soldiers. I am going to Camp Humphreys, South Korea for the dedication of a medical building in his name in March of 2018. I believe the triple CMB is the rarest army award. He served with the 25th Infantry Division in WWII, the 7th Infantry Division in the Korean war and the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam. Truly, an American hero.
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SFC Operations Nco
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post pictures of the building when you return. that is truly awesome.
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SPC Jan Allbright, M.Sc., R.S.
SPC Jan Allbright, M.Sc., R.S.
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WOW! Now that is a heaping helping of HOOAH! I was a combat medic with the 1st in Vietnam as well .. If I had known I would have tracked him down and shaken his hand. Naming a medical building after MSG Jenkins is the absolute least the Army could do to remember this true American hero! Thank you for the update and YES please post some pictures.
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SFC Contract Administrator
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Awesome story of heroics.
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SSgt Alex Robinson
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great post thanks for sharing
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