Posted on Jun 1, 2017
SGT Joseph Gunderson
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PTSD used to be looked at with a kind of stigma that prevented many from seeking help. Today it is far more acceptable to go seek therapy and or medication for this issue, but have we gotten to a point where many actually claim to suffer from the disorder without actually having it just to seem like part of "the club"? Why has PTSD become some kind of badge of honor these days?
Posted in these groups: 78568930 PTSD
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SGM Erik Marquez
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Edited >1 y ago
"Today it is far more acceptable to go seek therapy and or medication for this issue"
I agree, though many still view it as "a kind of stigma" and refuse to seek treatment due to the possible second and third-order effects, either immediately or in the future as a local, state, or federal government decides to use that diagnosis of PTSD factor in restricting a right.

"Why has PTSD become some kind of badge of honor these days?"
I don't think it has, I think it has become the complaint of choice of the last 15 years used to defraud the government of benefits. Like "unspecified back pain" was used in years prior, in the military and civilian worlds..., PTSD is used now by those wanting to get medical and financial benefits they otherwise would not be allowed..and PTSD like that old back pain deal can not be disproved by medical doctors...
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SGT Writer
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I didn't know "unspecified back pain" was ever considered a common "lie". Luckily my x-rays proved my case. Wait, maybe I should say "unlucky". How about "fortunately for my medical record"?
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SGM Erik Marquez
SGM Erik Marquez
>1 y
The nature of back pain possible soft tissue damage nerve impingement and other things makes it very difficult to disapprove perhaps recent medical technology in the last 10 years has change that
But for a long time unemployment benefits or Workmen's Comp. benefits were paid out because an employee said "my back hurts I can't work"
The doctors could simply say we can't prove it is that but we can't disprove it is it
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PO1 Robert Wikert
PO1 Robert Wikert
>1 y
I'm sure there are people out there who are trying to defraud the govt by claiming back pain. When I joined in 1967 my first DS was the USS Constitution, not that that would make any difference, anyway I fell coming down a ladder and landed flat on my back, I was 19. I am now 74 and have had chronic backpain since 1967. Just over a year ago I was declared to be 60% disabled by the VA and am now drawing a check. My point here is that not all people are faking their pain, just like not all people who claim PTSD aren't faking. SGM Erik Marquez, perhaps you are one of those lucky folks who don't let anything bother them. But I know without a doubt that PTSD exists and is real, and debilitating. PTSD isn't just a military problem, my wife was sexually, physically, and emotionally abused as a child and spent several years in therapy learning to deal with what happened to her as a child, and that is PTSD, but it has affected her entire life, and again that is PTSD. In 1984 I was working a part time job pumping gas while stationed in Jax Fl, and there was a young man who worked the day shift, he was a (former)Marine who had spent three tours in VN. This poor young man had so much survivor's remorse it was difficult to watch. He also was carrying a terrible secret around, after many nights of deep discussions, which I believe was only possible because I too was a veteran. He finally told me his story, I won't go into detail, but understand this man was an absolute wreck, and at times would even think he was back in the action. So, although I'm sure there are people out there who are trying to take advantage of the system, not everyone who claims PTSD is faking.
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CPT James Burkholder
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My outlook has never changed. I think the problem has been present since WWI, but during that "Great War" and WWII, and even Korea and to some extent VN, we had significant numbers of the citizens and their families a part of it, whether they wanted to be so or not. Vets returning, even those spit upon during VN, still had neighbors, classmates from high school, and work colleagues to talk to, to reminisce and even cry over what they lived through. Now we have a volunteer military. Vets return after service have no real support other than the professionals - - most of whom can't actually relate to the guy/girl because they rarely experienced the same thing. Giving our present day vets support groups who actually know the experience would probably do more good than all the shrinks and social workers that are presently trying to deal with the problem the men and women face. Giving our present day vets access to that camaraderie they had during service would really help them.
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CSM Tony Blair
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After talking to older vets, they made me understand that this is a life long battle, there is no quick fix. And if after their life long struggle, made me see, there is hope.
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