Posted on Jul 20, 2021
SFC Mechanized Infantry Platoon Sergeant
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I am new to the PSG position and am working to build a Platoon Sergeants Leaders Book. For those of you more experienced in the role than I, what do you keep in your Leaders book? What works for you, what doesn't work? Any and all advice would be helpful and we just might be able to help out some others along the way with idea sharing. Thanks all for your help!
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SFC Retention Operations Nco
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This is what I would suggest - you want the things that will be asked for, and the things you will want to know. Ignore those fancy "baseball cards" and other nonsense that people make for presenting their leadership books for inspections. Your leadership book needs to be the things you will need to look up quickly, but exempt any PII or other protected information.

The things you'll want will be an ERB, a very very basic personal data sheet with DODI, SSN, family and family birthdays, anniversary, current home address, and permanent profiles. You'll use this for writing awards, NCOER's, and (hopefully) giving Soldiers the day off for anniversaries and birthdays.

The things you'll be asked for that you will want to have in your leader book are schools attended, blood type (not all are on the SRB), blood type (completely worthless because the CSH will retype them if they need blood), battle roster numbers, MIL drivers license numbers, mask sizes, uniform sizes, boot sizes, hat sizes, spouse or emergency POC.

All that is hard data and that's what should go in hard format of a PSG leader book. But you have moving data as well and that should go onto an Excel spreadsheet tracker. Things you want to track on excel are weapons serials, optics serials, mask serials, really any serial for any property whatsoever, DLC dates, NCOER thru dates, PCS dates, YMAV dates, DEROS dates, ETS dates, DOR/TIG dates for promotion, anything related to promotion eligibility, an entire separate tab for MEDPROS/PRR/Admin readiness (including cyber awareness, and whatever additional classes your unit requires), PT/weapons/ACFT scores and dates.

Things not to have - Don't keep SSN's in a leader book you carry with you, it's too much PII. You are not allowed to request previous NCOER's from your Soldier, that is protected by regulation. Don't ask for previous GOMORs, Article 15s, or anything protected under Unfavorable Information. Don't ask for spouse emails they will already by bombarded by FRG. Don't use some old personnel data sheet that asks too much info, make your own that only asks what you need; some of those have crazy info that you don't need or shouldn't be on a sheet of paper that is left around like mothers maiden name or Soldier location of birth.
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SFC Mechanized Infantry Platoon Sergeant
SFC (Join to see)
10 mo
Great Information. I appreciate your response!
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SPC Robert Hendrickson
SPC Robert Hendrickson
9 mo
also I agree with S.F.C. J Boyd, with his info .. but if you can shorthand a bit of that info but know/remember what the shorthand is/means seriously, and see my other post as well
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SSG Psychological Operations Specialist
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Not a PSG but have been in a similar role many times. For each Soldier:
DOD ID#
DOR/Eval due dates
Blood type
Next NCOES
DL atatus for grade


I also keep my 50m targets and 100m targets tracked on there as well as my sections OML for schools.
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SFC Mechanized Infantry Platoon Sergeant
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10 mo
thanks!
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SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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Edited 10 mo ago
I kept a book of important forms that were frequently used. I kept my company and platoon SOPs. I made sure that each infantry squad and each individual KNEW their platoon and company SOPs. Of course I would have platoon training guides especially on different kinds of patrolling to include before, during, and after action reports where EVERYTHING could be done together by memory. I also had an alphabetical copy of every TM and FM for quick reference, profiles both permanent and temporary, fitness and PT scores, and a notebook where I could write special training needs for individuals; for example, I would keep a journal each soldier's non confidential info like birthdays, interests, hobbies, and where each person was from, promotion lists, and especially the training needs for every soldier. I had quick training book for every team and squad leader leader to develop their skills and overall training needs (We had yearly Skill Qualification Tests so those skills were constantly assess proficiency and to develop the training regimen). We also had no down time. Whenever we were waiting, NCOs were expected to be training; for example, we would give mini lessons on radio procedures using proper call signs and using daily radio frequencies from the battalion.

Our primary concerns as NCOs is mission, welfare of soldiers, and maintenance and care for equipment. I briefly mentioned the first two. Most importantly, I had a copy of every soldier's personal list of uniforms, gear and equipment, and especially the record of every soldier's serial number of every weapon, NVD, radio, and vehicle, and who was responsible that vehicle (every driver and track commander mech and light infantry vehicles). I was not an E-7, but every platoon sergeant I ever had trained me to take charge of the platoon when I was a squad leader. I hope I was able to help.

By the way, the missing equipment and weapons at certain military posts is the direct fault of the laziness of NCOs who are not securing weapons and ammunition. No soldier should ever be dismissed from training exercises until every piece of equipment is cleaned and accounted for. That is the reason for daily inpections by every NCO. Our first sergeants and COs did not dismiss the company until everything was accounted for.
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CWO3 Us Marine
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10 mo
Info is power. You never know when a few pubs or rote memory can help in the planning phase. Hasty planning demand hasty facts. Even basic figures like weight per gal etc. help trigger pullers with log requests. I carried about three basic Warfare sources and relied on on-hand assets for the rest. That's exclusive to being a POG wrench turner Completely Without Employment several times. We always had a full library. One of 5 that each Battalion held for 3 MEUS, usage, and Master. I forgot the designators, but they were stolen in Naha coming through TMO. Unclassified boilerplate and maneuver warfare. Loggies take it for granted at times, that the Force has a spare Company for RAS. Gen Gray recognized this gap and prepped the Force. I jumped on a slot for Inf Plt Sgt Crse late 80s for the training. I was Engrs and there was an Ammo Tech in the Infantry career class leading to MOS 0369. Some hard chargers for sure. We survived. I gained lots of respect for Infantry.
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SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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10 mo
CWO3 (Join to see) - Speaking of ammo, when I and an E-6 had to run the battalion rifle qualifications in Mainz, we were required to police brass and count it. Every round of ammunition had to be counted to assure no theft or loss occurred. While that may sound mindless or trivial to some, it teaches several things. Snipers police their brass. It also teaches accountability which is the duty of every NCO. It teaches attention to detail which creates a more disciplined and alert mindset that is necessary for the safety and success of military operations in training and combat. And probably the most important aspect is safety. Stolen ammunition can be deadly in garrison or sold on the black market. I have been out of the military for nearly forty years and non service members do not understand attention to detail.

What annoys me the most is others talking during meetings. No one in the military does that. Day one of basic training is speak only when spoken to and no talking in classes unless ordered at ease. Simple. Why so strict? It teaches respect for rank, it teaches the importance of hearing and understanding instructions, and it teaches noise discipline.
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SFC Mechanized Infantry Platoon Sergeant
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10 mo
Thanks, These have been very helpful
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CWO3 Us Marine
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10 mo
SGT (Join to see) - Meetings usually take up time to do what we are already doing. There's usually one "Spring Butt" that loves to hear their own voice, to the chagrin of the rest. Ammo is no joke. The BLT S4 mistakenly blew up some LFORM (ARGs war reserves) ammo in Somalia, which is a no-no. He was quickly promoted to Major.
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