Posted on Jun 25, 2021
SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
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I got out of the Army a year ago after serving 4 years as a medic, I'm considering reenlistment but would like to reclass and am considering alternative MOS's. My experience in the medical field was reasonably enjoyable but I feel an MOS in legal, cyber, or intelligence would likely be better suited to me. If you've served any time in any of those fields or MOS's I'd love to hear what you thought about it and what the day-to-day experience entailed.
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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All the soldiers in the Legal realm that I know have all agreed the promotion rates are slow as a snail in molasses in the Arctic.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
Everything I've read about 27D says that is indeed the case, fortunately if I reenlist I'm not really in a rush to promote (I know, famous last words). I'm mostly interested in finding a field that I can potentially turn into a lifelong career.
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SPC Lead Security Officer
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
Making SGT and even SSG are doable in my MOS, slots do make themselves available. Getting SFC though, there's only one slot in the whole state for that and no MSG slot available. Granted I'm talking about Guard and I'm sure the Reserves sees similar slot issues compared to that of Active.

Thankfully there's a path to Warrant if you get stuck too long and that's an option a paralegal wants to consider.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
Huh, prior to this I was actually unaware 27D could transition to warrant. Perhaps it's simply because the grass always seems greener on the other side but to me WO sounds like a dream job. It's good to know there's an opportunity for advancement beyond the enlisted ranks not requiring a bachelor's degree.
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SPC Lead Security Officer
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
SPC (Join to see) - 270A Legal Administrator, kind of a balance between Paralegal and Judge Advocate. They handle a lot of the background tasks that keep a legal office running among other responsibilities.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
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Started as a grunt (11B) then went to Intel and did a few different intel jobs. My experience is that the Army is the Army. Your MOS is less important to what you will be doing on a day-to-day than your specific position, and your unit. A 35F in a strategic unit is going to have more in common with a 35P in a strategic unit than they will with a 35F in a FORSCOM unit.

Generally speaking, as an intel guy you are going to get little to no respect from the grunts who you support, but if you are doing your job well, those grunts' bosses are going to know you are worth your weight in gold. Some days will be easy, others will be tough. Some long, others short - and some you won't even have to come in at all - just like any other job in the Army. If you do your job, and do it well, you will move up the ladder. Some MOSs move up the ladder quicker than others. No matter what job you have, someone else's job will look cooler - and someone will think your job is super-cool.

I have spent time working JSTARS (which is now an ASI for 35G), 35M, and 35F jobs, most of it in FORSCOM, but some in TRADOC (no strategic time). If you have specific questions, I will do my best to answer.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
As a 68W my entire time was spent in a hospital environment, I worked in a clinical setting that was dramatically different from what a FORSCOM medic might expect. My expectation is that a strategic unit will likely have a similar environment to the clinical one I've experienced where the majority of the work is done in an office. Is this true? I'd be interested to hear what the day-to-day experience of an intelligence MOS in FORSCOM is like, I'm having a tough time imagining what they'd end up doing that's different from an 11B.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
5 mo
SPC (Join to see) - Well, I was never in a strategic unit, so I can't say for sure. But yes, they DO spend the majority of their time in an office. From what I understand, they even "go to the field" in an office.

As for Intel in FORSCOM, it is actually.... mostly in an office! It depends on the specific MOS, of course, but Intel Soldiers in garrison generally spend their "duty day" (outisde of PT, details, motor stables, and other routine "Army things") in one of three "modes." Garrison unit support, tactical training, or technical training.

Garrison unit support is doing things that support the unit in garrison. This is things like physical security inspections and reports, personnel security, research for whatever the Commander wants researched, or any other thing that those intel folks are particularly suited for. The bulk of this falls on the 35Fs and 35Ls. The other MI MOSs have very clear laws and limits on what they can do involving US citizens and assets, so applying their particular skills in a non-training scenarios stateside is particularly limited. I hope I do not need to explain that one in depth. That does not mean, however, that those other MOSs cannot (or do not) help run an S2 shop, participate in research, or pull other garrison support duties.

Technical training is training to develop specific MOS or MOS-related skills. This can be things like language training, ASI-producing or career development schools (ALC, SLC, Collection Manager, Information Collection Planner, Source Operations Course, Strategic Debriefer, etc.), basic Soldier skills (rifle range, first aid training, etc.), or equipment proficiency (troubleshooting, operation, assembly, etc.). For a few of the Intel MOSs this is the primary focus in garrison, because many of these skills are perishable, and if they are not consistently re-inforced they will be mostly lost (such as language skills).

Tactical training is training to put those technical skills to use. Here we move from learning how to put a Prophet into operation (for example) to actually using it to do those things a Prophet does (I am trying to keep the post from even approaching the concept of leaving the unclassified realm, please forgive the vagueness). Language training moves from sustainment and testing to actual translation of tapes or records, or even having conversations in the target language. This training can take place in the comforts of garrison or in a field environment, depending on the type of training and the unit training calendar.

Overall, the majority of time for the majority of intel Soldiers is spent in an office environment, even in FORSCOM. When intel goes to the field, they generally operate out of tents - in an office environment. Sometimes they operate out of shelters on their trucks - which are mobile office environments.

Obviously, not all experiences will be the same. Depending on the MOS, unit, and position, you may be attached to an infantry platoon in the field and going everywhere they go, doing everything they do, and then doing what you do on top of that (kind of like a FiSTer or a line medic). As I said at the beginning; it is like anything else in the Army - it will depend on your MOS, position, and unit more than anything else.



I hope this helps. If I missed the mark, or you need clarification, let me know.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
This is a ton of great information, thanks again for taking the time to answer and write all of this out. The information I've gotten from people on Rallypoint has been great alongside what I was able to glean from answers on other sites, I was unsure if I wanted to transition to an intelligence MOS or a legal one. I think both sound equally appealing at this point, they're the MOS's I'll be asking about at the recruiter's office this week.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
5 mo
SPC (Join to see) I have found myself participating more in political discussions of late, but the entire reason I joined RP was to be able to help out young troops even though I am retired. Happy to be able to help, and if you have any further questions, feel free to hit me up.
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CPT Staff Officer
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35F Military Intel Analyst was the best job I've had so far in my 48 year life.
All the military type stuff applies. Get up early, work out, have a regimented daily schedule and be bound by the limitations of your rank and MOS.

Once in the office, log into all the systems with a bazzilion passwords and get to work on the intel production you have been tasked with. As much time as there might be in regard to office work and down time, being in a classified facility basically kills internet surfing and social medial. But there is plenty of cool secret stuff to become familiarized with your area of focus.

You get exposure to the top. Not that you get access to them, but you get to sit in the same room when the adults are making decisions based on products you created.

OR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If you are branded as low speed, high drag you can be tasked with updating the weather reports pushed out by the USAF. Then below that is making coffee, and cleaning the SCIF.

Regardless........ rank will dictate the crap jobs, but when we did our weekly burn pile it was a time to chill away from any higher ups. Since it was a classified burn pile we were sequestered from anyone without clearance and anyone that outranked us didn't want anything to do with the task. So it was pretty cool sham gig to decompress once a week.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
Thanks for the information, it's a huge help in determining what I might expect from the field. I still have access to my GI Bill benefits, in your experience is the intelligence field better experienced from the officer side vs the enlisted? I'm trying to determine if it's preferable to go into the reserves and prioritize finishing my schooling or go active and resume working full time.
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CPT Staff Officer
CPT (Join to see)
5 mo
SPC (Join to see) - Either way, just knock out a degree. While I might prefer an Intel Officer path, the opportunities are elsewhere in terms of promotion vacancies in my path of Logistics. 35F enlisted often had a much easier promotion path with lower point thresholds, and willingness to waive requirements. For example, I made SGT without BLC, and the required points were only 34 at the time. I've never seen 35F above 100 points for promotion.

A degree will serve you well either path you go. Not having it will limit you toward Sr. NCO boards relative to your competition, and having it will leave the window open for Officer. The reality of the situation is every competent soldier regardless of rank has a degree. So while, officers technically have to have a degree, and WO's and NCO's don't, they typically all do anyway.
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SPC Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SPC (Join to see)
5 mo
Fair enough, thanks again for the info. My intention is to finish my degree regardless, it's mostly a question of whether I do so expeditiously or incrementally while working. I'm inclined to the latter, I've been attending full time for the past year and it has been an absolute chore.
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