Posted on Jun 14, 2019
SGT Physical Therapy Specialist
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This soldier keeps going to sick call and getting quarters but it’s at weird times, always complaining of stomach issues. Do I have to catch the soldier In the act or are there any other avenues that would support my case?
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Responses: 31
CWO3 Us Marine
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Being sick is not against the UCMJ, but malingering is. Does it impact the mission enough to warrant your time spent on it? If so, proceed but tread lightly. No underhanded sneaky peaky or outright surveillance. You should be documenting it regularly but only facts. If he later is boarded for conduct or health it will be helpful. Partner with NCOIC or PSG and go from there. Get your ducks aligned first.
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CWO3 Us Marine
CWO3 (Join to see)
3 y
SSgt Joseph Baptist - As a Wobbly One (WO1) I got pneumonia in the winter while at MEC-Pohang. Had an x-ray to find out why lungs were gurgling. One was 2/3 full of fluids. We were living in a hardback GP tent, but had a kerosene heater. The Corpsman put me on indefinite bed rest and huge antibiotic pills, plus lots of fluids. I only got out of my sleeping bag to make head calls for about 2 days. By the third day I was able to eat chow they brought from field mess, and was basically mended. So I can relate to being legitimately sick in the field. I agree with your suggestions.
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SSgt Joseph Baptist
SSgt Joseph Baptist
3 y
CWO3 (Join to see) - Side note - our Bde "solved" a problem with a large number of vehicles being deadlined and keeping people from going to the field by towing all the deadlined vehicles out to the field maintenance site, and requiring their crews to remain there until either their vehicle was repaired, or the field problem was over.
Didn't harm those whose vehicles were legitmately broken, but removed the "reward" for those who were faking.
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CWO3 Us Marine
CWO3 (Join to see)
3 y
SSgt Joseph Baptist - They need to learn how to do their job in the field. It's a different ballgame when away from all the maintenance equipment in garrison. On ship is a different situation as well, but if you're a wrench turner you have to do it in support of the mission.
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MSgt Michael Smith
MSgt Michael Smith
3 y
SGT (Join to see) - By being a Doctor.
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CW2 Amd Tech
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You can bring your concerns up to your command, the commander has a open line of communication with the Unit PA/ legal team and can bring up any concern regarding a malingering soldier to them. You aren’t a medical professional (PA), and any accusation of malingering to a soldier is threading on thin ice.
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Maj John Bell
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I do not know if this would fly anymore.

Most often, if someone was malingering it was to get out of a field event, or force march. I used them as training aids. After consulting with the Battalion surgeon, any Marine that could go to the field without violating medical restrictions, did. Within the limits imposed by the Battalion Surgeon and supervised by the Battalion Medical Chief and Company Corpsmen the "sick, lame, and lazy" were treated as battlefield casualties.

Appropriate to the training event, they were used as simulated casualties who had to be found, retrieved, treated, evacuated, and transported to the Battalion Aid Station (BAS). A CP tent was set up outside the garrison Command Post as the "Battalion Aid Station." During field exercises the "casualties" were either in the field, or in garrison restricted to the CP tent. While in the garrison BAS, they rested and recovered under the loving care of the Battalion Officer of the Day and the Staff Duty, without distractions like TV, radio, etc. etc. No one went to their quarters, for the duration of the field exercise.

It seems that boredom has medicinal restorative properties.
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SSG Squad Leader
SSG (Join to see)
3 y
That will show who is trying to get out of something and who has a real problem.
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