Posted on Feb 14, 2017
SFC Squad Leader
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Posted in these groups: Ncoa NCO AcademyLeadership abstract 007 LeadershipAll Covered
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SGM Erik Marquez
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Edited >1 y ago
The good ones don't, unless that subordinate needs it.

SGT, the task is, needs to be done by, you have X, Y and Z to get it done, let me know when its finished or what and why you cant. QUESTIONS? , Good, ....why are you still standing here??????????
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SGM Erik Marquez
SGM Erik Marquez
>1 y
CSM Charles Hayden - Will you look at that, so it is..... wounder how I came up with that coincidence.
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MSG Brad Sand
MSG Brad Sand
>1 y
SGM Erik Marquez
Not disagreeing...as I disagree...but I found that you needed to tailor your leadership to the level of those you were leading. Often, especially with those new to their position, ETC, you might provided more guidance...micromanagement even...while your more seasoned leaders you may not even needed to provided any guidance as they have grown to anticipate what their soldiers would need.
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SGM Erik Marquez
SGM Erik Marquez
>1 y
MSG Brad Sand - MSG Brad Sand 1 m ago said..
"SGM Erik Marquez
Not disagreeing...as I disagree"

LOL, voice to text auto corrected again I see......
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MSG Brad Sand
MSG Brad Sand
>1 y
SGM Erik Marquez -
No, that was all me...thinking it in my own mind and typing it into the comment. It really was not disagreeing, I assume (and yes, I do know), but just refining what you had said.
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MSG Intermediate Care Technician
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As SGM Erik Marquez once said in a different thread.....and what other Senior NCOs have also said........trust but verify. If you have trust in your NCOs, give them the mission and let them loose. Sure, follow up to see that it was done to the Commanders intent, but trust they get it done. If you have to micromanage your NCOs, then either you or they...or both....shouldn't be an NCO.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
>1 y
That's true on up the line too. Nothing keeps the troops attention like knowing someone will actually check their work. As company commander, I made sure that I knew enough to inspect a vehicle or weapon, I would often get the driver, operator or gunner to "show" me how to PCMS a piece of equipment with the book open. NCO leadership I generally left to my 1st Sgt, and luckily I had some good ones. I generally had my hands full keeping the Lt's lined out. My advice and plan was always to insure that they had the training to do the job and then expect them to do it.
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SGM Erik Marquez
SGM Erik Marquez
>1 y
CPT Lawrence Cable - The catch phrase is "CDR, don't expect, what you don't inspect"
Troops know, if its not worth your time, it ain't worth theirs.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
>1 y
I couldn't agree more. That and making sure that you walked the walk as well as talked the talk. If I pulled a vehicle, I made sure they saw me pull maintenance on it, cleaned my own weapons, etc. You have to lead by example, no matter what level you are at.
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CW3 Joseph Antosiak
CW3 Joseph Antosiak
>1 y
I was helped immensely, originally as a civilian but also as a warrant officer, by a book called "The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey". Boiled down, it says that once you have determined that an individual should be responsible for job X, you have to know him/her well enough to know whether to turn them loose on X and let them solve any problems themself; have them get back to you if and when problems develop; or (especially if they are new) whether to have them get back to you with a plan for X before they start work. As they grow in experience, you give them more latitude, so that ideally you end up with nothing to do yourself except write their EERs. :-)
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CAPT Kevin B.
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Micromanagement is not restricted to NCOs. You have it at all supervisory/leadership relations anywhere, MIL, commercial, Boy Scouts, Church. Anytime you have someone in charge of something, you can get this. So what causes it? Although everyone has their own observation, a few common threads emerge. For the most part, people are not taught to manage well. They learn by observing and then repeat the behavior, good or bad. Then there is the person who thinks they're superior to everyone else and ensures people do things exactly as they'd do it. Then there are the insecure, self doubting, fearful types who meddle in everything because they're scared. Then there are those who've suffered shock treatment and become micros with a vengeance. I knew an LT who was a trusting macro. Good guy. Then he had some tours elsewhere and then came back as a flaming micro Alpha Hotel. He obviously had a load of bricks dropped on him, so his reaction was to go full micro as a defensive mechanism. His career ended shortly thereafter but unfortunately wound up as a senior civil servant who got to share his paranoia with a new crowd.

The bigger question is how do you tamp down on a micro culture. It's the Nike motto: Just do it. Good leadership knows that micro overall is bad and overly macro is bad also. So as Skipper I set the tone and expected my CoC to exhibit/push good leadership skills. Act how you want your subordinates to act. My SELs had a large role in getting the NCO community on the right sheet of paper. You then reward those who get it and ensure those who don't have risen to their level of incompetence. That's why I always had my "Rule of Thirds". Those you push to guaranteed promotion. Those you don't harm. Those you do. The evaluation system, for all it's PC garbage speak words, really means you have to think in those terms. Make sure the micros are in the bottom third.
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SP5 Steve Powell
SP5 Steve Powell
>1 y
Behavior is a product of belief...change the belief and you change the behavior. Easier said than done as you said, "...learn by observing and then repeat the behavior". I like instances where coaching and mentoring opportunities help direct individual growth without their feeling they are being directed as the circumstance requires. One of my mentors often admonished me to "teach them, train them and then trust them". Again, easier said than done but a good start. :-)
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