Posted on Sep 8, 2016
MAJ Vance Fleming
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Posted in these groups: Money budget BudgetAir combat art 0134 CombatImages 3 SupportEnlisted military slide 2015 Personnel
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Responses: 11
SN Greg Wright
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Edited >1 y ago
Sorry, Major, but no Air Force fixed-wing pilot is ever going to land on a carrier.
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SN Greg Wright
SN Greg Wright
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No, CSM. Tibbets never landed on a carrier.
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CSM Charles Hayden
CSM Charles Hayden
>1 y
What did they practice for in FL?
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SGM Steve Wettstein
SGM Steve Wettstein
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CSM Charles Hayden - They practiced take offs in FL Chuck.
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SGT Bryon Sergent
SGT Bryon Sergent
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Also Doolittle, but they only Launched from a carrier and they were ARMY Air corp!
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MAJ Vance Fleming
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Tradition is not reason enough to waste our military capabilities. With a smaller military and budget concerns, it is important to maximize where troops are placed.
Why does each service need its own aviation, medical service, payroll system, personnel system, logistics, transportation, etc.? Why have infantry, armor and artillery in the Marines and the Army? Why have boats in the Army, Marines and Navy? I am sure there are many more examples.

Here is my proposal:

Consolidate all the branches into one military (Department of Defense) service with one medical, human resource, pay, supply and other support systems. All support positions (hospitals, supplies, finance, personnel) will follow one system. This will reduce the number of troops needed to fill those support positions by probably about one-quarter to one-third of the current level. These positions can be moved to the combat arms.
A lot of the permanent garrison positions could be civilians, thus freeing up more troop numbers for the combat arms.

There would be one branch of infantry, armor, artillery, aviation, naval assets instead of being spread across all services. Internally, there can be specialized units for unique missions.

Instead of each service having its own special operators, have one the can also have specialized functions internally.

Consolidate bases into about seven joint locations; one forward-operating base each in the Pacific and Europe; one each, west coast, east coast, southern US / Texas (all with lots of training / maneuver space, private airstrips and docks for ships); central US and somewhere in the northern Midwest (all with lots of training / maneuver space, and private airstrips).

Being consolidated assets, there would be less time needed for emergency coordination as procedures would be internal to that location and under one commander.
This would also reduce the number of senior officers (specifically, flag officers), the need for a Joint Chiefs of Staff and the number of people needed at the Pentagon.

Another cost savings would be in the minimized number of types of uniforms, awards, accoutrements, and Service Schools / ROTC programs.

I am sure I am overlooking many other areas. I am also sure that there are tons of costs involved with such a transition.

I look forward to the responses I get.
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SN Greg Wright
SN Greg Wright
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I agree that tradition is not a good enough reason...but it IS the reason it's never going to happen. I like the idea for support stuff like admin/medical, etc. But how are you going to teach Air Force to storm a beach like the Marines? Or Army guys to fight Naval vessels? No, I think the idea is entirely sound...but will never happen.
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SCPO Investigator
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Brilliant concept, Vance, something that a vast number of cities/counties are doing across the nation. Combining police/sheriff crime labs. Combining jails. Combining vehicle maimtenance. Etc., etc., etc. I think you idea has tons of merit. Getting two green, one blue, and one black Class A uniform to agree is your first hurdle.
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TSgt Team Chief
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How about starting with basic training! Have a single basic training for all military with a focus on physical development and military culture (in general). Based on the assessment at basic training, recruits can move on to other further training that either focuses on developing the functional skills before indocterinating the branch culture.

Also, if we have a single basic that focuses on physical development, imagine the opportunities that civilians could pay to endure and make significant gains in short period of time. Say a 30 day regiment. The DOD could justify it as necessary to ensure national readiness due to the rise in obesity in todays youth as well as todays skilled workers.
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Capt Michael Greene
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It's very practical. Each service has its own operating environment which requires a unique philosophy, doctrine, culture, policies and procedures. Each service has optimized its procedures to maximize effectiveness in their own environment.

Consider HR/Pay types. Would they all be trained in the procedures used both aboard ship and also in the desert? Would they have to learn 4 sets of regulations?

Different procedures make for a different mindset: Air Force pilots use mile-long runways and gradually settle down on the glide path until touchdown halfway down the runway. Navy pilots won't put a foot of runway behind them; they'll put it down on the numbers. Different policies: In the Navy, if there is a fire, all hands attack the fire until Damage Control arrives. In the Air Force, all hands evacuate and wait for the Fire Dept. Different capabilities: A common specialty is dermatology. In the Army, derm doctors are needed right up front, as combat wounds almost always involve the skin. But how many doctors can you fit on a ship? In combat: The services don't have the same radios or the same language.

Importantly, each Division commander or Wing commander has under his personal command all the resources required to prosecute war without needing some other commander to provide supply, transportation, housing, etc. Very effective and efficient in war. Don't change it.
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