Posted on Jan 5, 2015
SPC Lucas Predmore
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Just curious, does anyone know why so many veterans leave the military and don't pursue entrepreneurship? The military has provided us with the perfect background for running a business. Even at the lower ranks, soldiers are getting leadership training. They are asked to make tough calls that most upper management will never be asked to make. So why do so many of them choose to get out of the military and go into regular jobs? I have my opinions but I am curious as to what others think.
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Responses: 21
CPT Will Sullivan
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My business partner and I are both veteran entrepreneurs, http://citywide.k3client.com/index.html. Its been my experience that vets that have entrepreneurship in their core test the waters first before taking the plunge into entrepreneurship. The real question comes down to what is their financial risk tolerance.
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SPC Lucas Predmore
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It is absolutely a risk. But there are plenty of opportunities that are low risk and very low overhead. There are lots of people who have started businesses from home including construction, teaching, sales, etc. I started a business and worked it part time until it out payed my full time job. It was no risk at all. There are obstacles, but another thing the military instills is the ability to overcome challenges. I think people get out and they are so stuck in the "follow orders" mentality that they simply fall in line and give up on their dreams.
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SSgt Carpenter
SSgt (Join to see)
8 y
I think it's more the stability than the need to follow orders. Any soldiers I've known HAVEN'T missed that portion of military life.
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SPC Lucas Predmore
SPC Lucas Predmore
8 y
I don't think any service members miss the ability to make their own decisions. But many of them get so in the habit that they just can't make their own decisions. I couldn't wait to get out and stop being micromanaged. Then when I joined the civilian world, I noticed myself waiting to be told what to do. The hardest part about transitioning for me was making my own decisions. I see many veterans who are still "sitting in line for SRP", waiting to be told what to do and when to do it. Not because they want to be that way, but because they have been intensely conditioned that way. Habits are one of the hardest things in life to overcome.
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SSgt Carpenter
SSgt (Join to see)
8 y
I can understand that
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SGT Brian Richardson
SGT Brian Richardson
8 y
I guess we could argue there are risks everywhere. there is no sugar coating the risks of owning a business. But how risky is it to have someone else in charge of your job?

There are ways to improve your odds of survival in business. The biggest thing is to do your homework BEFORE you venture out into a business. When possible, perform your anticipated business as a side job. Secure some customers, work out some initial kinks. Understand the competition.

Then when you have some momentum, venture out on your own. Be a part of support groups like this, the Chamber of Commerce, networking affiliates etc. Be proactive and you can be successful.

Here's an article about when to start a business. http://www.vetlaunched.com/best-time-start-business/
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PFC Kyle Belk
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Most of us just have the daily responsibilities that interfere with starting our own business. I personally just started my own business in finance and had to still work a job for 6 months before going with time with my company. Cover the basics first and make sure you have a great foundation. Plus when I first got out of the military, the transition program just sucks. Shove a bunch of information down your throat and boot you out. Lol.
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SGT Alexander Hildenbrandt
SGT Alexander Hildenbrandt
>1 y
HERE HERE, I created a business because of that. HAHA Retaliation.
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