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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Dec 12, 2014
RallyPoint Team
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SFC Mark Merino
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Edited >1 y ago
After my failed attempt to catch a 107mm rocket and throw it back towards the enemy, I had one whopper of a migraine for days. I was puking, eyes watering, ears ringing, extremely sensative to light and noise, vertigo, I even had a weird metal taste in my mouth,the list went on. One of my pupils was HUGE. My glasses didn't work anymore. It was pretty scary. The brain is an amazing piece of equipment. It has amazing resiliency as well. Don't ever accept a diagnosis like things won't improve much if you suffer from TBI residuals. There are many programs available with speech therapists, and neurologists that can help. For a long time, my brain and mouth weren't running at the same speed. I would talk, and knew what I wanted to say, but the words just stopped. Sometimes I would get scared and the tears would well up. I have a horrible time encoding new information. That is one of many reasons why Japanese is kicking my butt. I am trying to use parts of my brain that are in Iraq still. I have been with a speech therapist for years. The trick is to keep yourself calm, be patient, and as always...never give up.
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SSG(P) Instructor
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Oregon has a great Concussion Program at our OHSU teaching hospital, which is attached (sort of) to our VA hospital.  Probably a nice place to visit for a medical vacation.....@SFC Mark Merino.  The brain is resilient, but often times it can take years and permanently change your personality...hopefully for the better, because youre a pretty swell guy already, I wouldn't want to be on your bad side.  mTBI - Minor Traumatic Brain Injury doesn't sound like something you endured, my heart goes out to you.  You need all the therapy you can get...I see so many vets that just haven't been diagnosed yet.  Post-Concussion Syndrome is what you will have to deal with for some time.  Due to the congestion of tissues in your neck and head, you should consider allowing a chiropractor to co-treat you through some of your issues.

ICD-9 Code 310.2 Post-Concussion Syndrome 
Post-concussion syndrome, also known as post-concussive syndrome or PCS, is a set of symptoms that may continue for weeks, months, or a year or more after a concussion – a minor form of traumatic brain injury (TBI).[1][2][3] The rates of PCS vary, but most studies report that about 15% of individuals with a history of a single concussion develop persistent symptoms associated with the injury. A diagnosis may be made when symptoms resulting from concussion last for more than three months after the injury.[4][5] Loss of consciousness is not required for a diagnosis of concussion or post-concussion syndrome.[6]
The condition is associated with a wide range of symptoms: physical, such as headache; cognitive, such as difficulty concentrating; and emotional and behavioral, such as irritability. Many of the symptoms associated with PCS are common or may be exacerbated by other disorders, so there is considerable risk of misdiagnosis. Headaches that occur after a concussion may feel like Migraine headaches or tension-type headaches. Most headaches are tension-type headaches, which may be associated with a neck injury that occurred at the same time of the head injury.[7]
Though there is no treatment for PCS, symptoms can be treated; medications and physical and behavioral therapy may be used, and individuals can be educated about symptoms and provided with the expectation of recovery. The majority of PCS cases resolve after a period of time.
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SSG(P) Instructor
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Hey FYI SFC Mark Merino a 107 mm is not a football, although it may look like one...try not to catch it next time...instead throw it at the enemy and let them 'catch' it.
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COL Senior Strategic Cyber Planner
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The NICOE at Fort Belvoir, VA is pretty awesome. It is state of the art with a new Physical Therapy room and they have a partnership with the Old Guard to conduct equine therapy treatments.
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SPC David Shaffer
SPC David Shaffer
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I feel your pain everyday SFC Mark Merino ! I suffered an STBI around 2004. I was in every type of therapy after I had come out of a couple weeks in a coma. It has been about 10 years and I still have the headaches a lot. I also hurt my neck, back, hip, and shoulder, but my headaches aren't from tension.
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CPT Richard Riley
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I've taken the liberty of linking this in the Resources for Veterans & Service Members thread under the *** Traumatic Brain Injury recovery info *** discussion to gain more exposure.
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SSG Broadcast Nco
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The most important aspect of TBI, or concussions, is early detection. Whether it's a small fall, a knock to the head, or anything in between; it's always better to be checked out than to be hurt and not know about it.
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COL Senior Strategic Cyber Planner
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Then comes the gradual re training of the brain. I heard there are some doctors partnering with Luminosity to study the effects of brain games and the speed of recovery in TBI patients.
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SSG Broadcast Nco
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It's crazy how little details can affect the nature of our brain's and minds. Everything from a knock on the head to the increase or decrease in caffeine can chance or adjust our thoughts and how we process things. I would definitely be interested in seeing the military partner with Luminosity and see how fast things develop with their games and puzzles.
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