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Responses: 26
CPT Jack Durish
13
13
0
They need to master these skills but I bet that they're asking themselves why. We have GPS, don't we? Navigation is an art as well as a science. I began studying and practicing it at a tender age and was competing successfully against accomplished navigators when I was just 16. Winning too. Thus, when I entered the Army, I was prepared to teach my instructors a few tricks they didn't know. That being said, I think that GPS is both a blessing and a curse. It's going to save a lot of errors and lives until it doesn't work. (Batteries go dead, etc, etc, etc...)
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MAJ Grant Gutkowski
MAJ Grant Gutkowski
2 y
I had my private pilots license going in to Basic and OCS...so land nav and I were old friends. I can tell you that there were a lot of NCOs that had quite a bit of trouble with it. , and one former Marine in which basic land nav was completely alien (he eventually bolo'd and was held back). I was surprised, but gave them all a refresher anyway.
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MSG Tom Earley
MSG Tom Earley
2 y
It's been 20 years since I was a Scout Platoon Sergeant in Hawaii, but back then we got tasked sometimes to support the Land Nav for Cadet Summer Camp at east Range. Map, Compass, and Protractor is all they got; no GPS devices. Once their Cadre trained them, out they went, and some got lost. Skills are perishable if you don't use them on a regular basis. Recently at Camp Blanding, Florida a soldier from a Reserve unit got lost on Land Nav, and died of dehydration.
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SSgt Keith Barrows
SSgt Keith Barrows
2 y
Electronic warfare can turn all of gadgets into an unseen enemy of the mission. Knowing how to do things with our Mark-I brain and our Mark-I eyeballs can save the mission. And as we continue marching into the future, it will get worse - not better.
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
2 y
MSG Tom Earley - Hawaii is tough on land navigation. The terrain isn't like anywhere else and it isn't forgiving. There are canyons with no exit other than straight up one of its walls. And the ridges are like knives in places. You walk with one foot on each side and pray that you don't stumble and fall. A lot of people, even experienced hikers got lost back there...
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SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
12
12
0
2nd Lt leading them? lol.
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LCDR T.J. Smith
LCDR T.J. Smith
2 y
The usual stupid remark. Almost all Army and Marine Officers are proficient at this basic, but hard to learn from scratch topic.
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SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
2 y
LCDR T.J. Smith sorry sir , but 2nd Lt's have always been the butt of many a joke.
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LCDR T.J. Smith
LCDR T.J. Smith
2 y
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth - They were when I was an enlisted Marine as well. Of course it was quite clear most, if not all new more than I did. Including Land NAV, which I was pretty damn good at.
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SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
2 y
LCDR T.J. Smith I met a few that had their heads screwed on right, and some that needed to be lead around like a little kid till they got a little education from wise NCOs'.
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MCPO Roger Collins
9
9
0
I’m thinking an ROTC Instructor is looking for a new job.
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LCDR T.J. Smith
LCDR T.J. Smith
2 y
Maybe the whole department.
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