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Brad Miller
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Fifteen years, original sentence? For a crime committed 18 years ago, where no one was injured? Isn't that just a LITTLE excessive? Fines, certainly. jail time, possibly (she did lie on government documents), but 15 (later 10) years ... wow!
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SFC Senior Counterintelligence Sergeant
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4 y
I really makes you wonder if there was some hidden factor that drove such a decision. The sentence was quite excessive.
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Capt Daniel Goodman
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Edited 4 y ago
That is certainly odd, obviously...one might admittedly think such a punishment more than somewhat excessive in such a case, as the article mentions was an opinion of those mentioned in it, given that all she was apparently doing was cleaning, just to make sufficient money working to feed her family...I of course haven't seen anything quite like that before, of course...clearly most unusual...then, too, if the diploma involved were for a high school, college, or some sort of professional training, God only knows what punishment might be mandated in such an instance, however, I'd clearly basically agree that, while obviously illegal, if she had no prior criminal history, there could've possibly been reimbursement, maybe mixed with community service, I suppose, though, of course, those are merely guesses on my part, certainly...the level of punishment in her case clearly seems Draconian, to say the least, you know? I recall an instance in an Asian country some years ago, where a kid had apparently been convicted of what I seem to remember was phrased as hooliganism, for keying cars, at least from what I had read back then, it was on the tube at the time as well, as he was actually punished to be flogged, I think on the soles of his feet, it might've been his back, however, I seem to also recall it being on the soles of his feet, as I'd said...there was a major hue and outcry at the time, as I remember, as Western countries, I think the kid and his family might've been from somewhere in Europe, possibly, I can't quite recall at the moment, were basically saying that they found the whole idea of actual flogging in that fashion as, essentially, "barbaric", as I remember the whole matter being phrased back then at the time, possibly some of you might remember the case, it garnered considerable notoriety, if you all might recall...I'll admit in her case the punishment might certainly be different, obviously, however, I'd consider 10 yrs for such an offense as, at least to my mind, certainly, as being more than slightly Draconian, as I'd said....
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SFC Senior Counterintelligence Sergeant
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4 y
It Seems like they were trying to make an example of her. I'm sure the word of such a punishment probably made quite a few Greeks think twice about stretching the truth on their documents.
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SPC Casey Ashfield
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And yet somehow Stolen Valor is free speech. Getting a little far down the rabbit hole of ridiculousness.
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SFC Senior Counterintelligence Sergeant
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4 y
Stolen Valor has a specific definition, and it is not protected by the 1st Amendment.
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SPC Casey Ashfield
SPC Casey Ashfield
4 y
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SFC Senior Counterintelligence Sergeant
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SPC Casey Ashfield They overturned the conviction of someone convicted under the original Stolen Valor Act of 2006, which was deemed unconstitutional. At the bottom of the article, it meantime the passing of a new law in 2013; the Stolen Valor Act of 2013. The 2013 version is still active.
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