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Cpl Jeff N.
6
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Edited >1 y ago
Military.com is owned by Sightline Media, the same company that owns Gannett/USA Today. I would not assume they have the militaries best interest at heart or what they are writing is reflective of reality. They MAVNI was stopped for very good reasons and while I support immigrants that have solid backgrounds getting a chance to serve it is not a guarantee and many will not make the screen.

The editorial leads with a typically deceptive paragraph:

"The greatest strength of our nation’s military has always been, and remains, our exceptional service members. The military services have the privilege of drawing from a large and diverse talent pool, including dedicated and talented immigrants. Today, there are thousands of immigrants serving with distinction."

The first sentence is true, the second sentence is partly true but not accurate. The vast majority of those that serve are US Citizens, period. Immigrants can be additive to the pool and they also present some risks that citizens may not. This program was stopped by the Obama administration which was a sound decision and the program needs to be revamped.
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SFC Intelligence Analyst
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Here's a fact sheet: https://immigrationforum.org/article/fact-sheet-military-accessions-vital-national-interest-mavni/

The Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest (MAVNI) program was authorized by the secretary of defense in November 2008. Its purpose is to address critical shortages of medical and strategic language personnel in the U.S. armed services by allowing certain qualified noncitizens to enlist in the U.S. military under Section 504(b)(2) of title 10, United States Code.

"A few facts:MAVNI was an entry point for personnel with critical language or medical skills who were in the U.S. temporarily, such as through student visas, or here seeking asylum. Most of its participants came from overseas – Africa, Southwest Asia, China, India, Eastern Europe – places where the U.S. had a need for those language skills. "
https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/07/06/heres-the-bottom-line-on-the-future-of-mavni-many-foreign-born-recruits-may-soon-be-out/
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Capt Marty Hogan
Capt Marty Hogan
>1 y
Col Joseph Lenertz - I did a little digging- I see medical as a specialty, language skills, and cultural background- no idea what a T3 or T5 security check would entail. I have also found a few references to Soros funding the organization and ties through other media outlets that are more liberal leaning and not fact reporting. Not disputing the good things it could do- but 10K recruited and in since 2009 seems like an uncomfortable number. I do not find where the are assimilated into the force however- the doc portion I can see and they have to credential in a recognized school to be in the military. I would be nervous if these were in cyber spots and we can't prove allegiances.
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SFC Intelligence Analyst
SFC (Join to see)
>1 y
There aren't that many cyber - not in the Army. After we came back to SLC when the shutdown was over in Jan, the classes got shuffled around. My new classroom we had three 35Q's (that's our cyber MOS). That's like having 3 unicorns in a room lol. They are pretty rare. I don't think they used MAVNI to fill cyber.
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LTC Psychological Operations Officer
LTC (Join to see)
>1 y
Col Joseph Lenertz - sir, I think you may have missed the single sentence in the article that stated that: "This special program, referred to as the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest program, was designed to authorize enlistment of non-U.S. citizens who possess certain critical language and medical skills."
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Col Joseph Lenertz
Col Joseph Lenertz
>1 y
Yes, definitely. Thanks.
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CW5 Jack Cardwell
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Thanks for sharing.
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