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Maj Charles Porter
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This shows bad judgment by the SPC with the gun. 1. Assault with with deadly weapon is never a good idea. 2. The Armorer or any other armed person would be fully justified to fire in self defense. 3. That young man would be Standing a Courts Marshal, if he survived his bootectomy.
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SSgt Joseph Baptist
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Edited >1 y ago
1. (Witness) Apprehend the subject (or disarm and detain the subject, if you don't have authority to apprehend - as an MP, NCO, or officer) using the minimum amount of force necessary to safely disarm and control them. Notify law enforcement. Give witness statement.

2. (Armorer/target) Use whatever force is necessary to defend yourself from this deadly threat. Apprehend the subject, using the minimum amount of force necessary to safely disarm and control them. Notify law enforcement. Give witness statement. Follow up, as is yoru right as the target/victim of the crime.

3. (Member of Chain of Command) Ensure that the offender is disarmed and detained. Do not participate in any cover-up - and report any such activity to the IG, your congresscritter, civilian LE, and the media, as required. Make sure that the offender faces full administrative consequences for violating regulations and safety protocols. Make sure that the offender is criminally prosecuted (in military and also possibly civilian courts) for their criminal behavior - assault with a deadly weapon, brandishing, etc. - as this was clearly a deliberate acts and not a negligent or accidental act.
Review weapons issue and turn-in procedures, and whether there was any negligence on the aprt of the armorer, the supervisors of the offender, the supervisors of the armorer, etc. - up through the chain of command.

Anything less than these would constitute dereliction of duty (at best) and could even be classed as acting as an accessory to the crime.
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1LT(P) Assistant Brigade Intelligence Officer (S2)
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>1 y
Very thorough review. I agree wholeheartedly - there is no excuse for this sort of behavior, and the individual has no place in the military or civil society.
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SSgt Investigative Analyst
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>1 y
Excellent analysis, brother. Defensor Fortis.
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SSgt Investigative Analyst
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Edited >1 y ago
Wow. We had clearing officials in the Air Force. We received our duty weapon from the armorer (the armorer wouldn't release the weapon just to lay it on the surface, it was always hand to hand, armorer to recipient.), mags first then weapon, proceeded with the firearm and the magazines separated to the clearing barrel and the clearing official, and inserted our mags, chambering and unsafing the M9. The armorer and the clearing official were always armed, and weapons safety was always paramount.

Arming troops were always separated. If you're standing in line to receive your duty weapon, you were a few feet back. I would hope that the second guy in line got to him first and subdued him. Otherwise, there would be a shootout in the armory.

If the offender survived that encounter, he's out of the military.
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1LT(P) Assistant Brigade Intelligence Officer (S2)
1LT(P) (Join to see)
>1 y
That's interesting that the armorer and clearing official are armed - this is when you receive your weapon? Or are you referring to when you're at the range and are getting checked on and off? In the Army, you are issued your weapon and then you carry it to the range and back - not sure if that's the same in the Air Force, or if they carry your weapon to the range and issue it to you once you get there.
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SSgt Investigative Analyst
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>1 y
1LT(P) (Join to see) - The armorer was always armed because he was surrounded by arms. The clearing official was assigned that position prior to taking his own post (we were AF security forces, so arming was a daily thing), so he got armed first. Range day was the same as it is with you: we got armed at the armory and carried our unloaded and safed weapons (whether it was the M9, M4, M60, M249) to the range, but the ammo was kept separate (you’re right; you carried the weapon, armorers issued the rounds at the range). Once armed at the armory for the range, though, that was your duty weapon for the day. All of the same procedures were in place like any other duty day.
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SSgt Joseph Baptist
SSgt Joseph Baptist
>1 y
Tony, Please see my response to the OP - I think you will agree that it meets our shared expectations.

Defensor Fortis, brother.
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