Avatar feed
Responses: 12
Lt Col Charlie Brown
7
7
0
I think there are several promising treatments and I suspect this won't be a "one size fits all" treatment needed
(7)
Comment
(0)
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
3 y
Think that's the problem, they're trying to treat PTSD as a "one size fits all" condition and that is just not the case.
(4)
Reply
(0)
Capt Daniel Goodman
Capt Daniel Goodman
3 y
Look at the stuff I just sent in, it'll help explain the whole thing in considerably greater, more explicit scientific and clinical detail, promise, OK?
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
Capt Daniel Goodman
4
4
0
https://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/devices/the-vagus-nerve-a-back-door-for-brain-hacking

This isn't quite the IEEE article I'd mentioned, however, it's fairly representative...it's highly germane to how the whole methodology of SGB actually functions, of that I'm quite positive....
(4)
Comment
(0)
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
3 y
Very interesting.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Capt Daniel Goodman
Capt Daniel Goodman
3 y
Much appreciated, I didn't eat to overwhelm, I just figured more specific detail of that type might be of interest....
(0)
Reply
(0)
Capt Daniel Goodman
Capt Daniel Goodman
3 y
Sorry, typo, didn't mean to overwhelm...wow is this tablet spell checker weird sometimes....
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
SSgt Richard Kensinger
1
1
0
From a clinical perspective, we differentiate non-complex PTSD from complex PTSD. In my clinical experience, combat vets experience the latter. Psychotherapy enables the vet to work thru layers of trauma. Group therapy is efficacious as it recapitulates the intimate psychosocial unit: the squad. In addition many combat vets exhibit SUD and compacted grief.
Rich
(1)
Comment
(0)
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
3 y
Thanks for the information.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close