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Responses: 17
MAJ James Woods
15
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Start with simplifying requirements and expectations that supports creating an effective operational work environment. Just because a training focus is mandatory doesn't mean it has to be conducted quarterly, semi-annually, or annually. Repetition doesn't equate to success; thus, adjust frequency of training to match mass personnel turnover rate. Imagine SHARP, suicide prevention, fraternization, ethics, cyber security, EEO, AT training, etc. conducted every 2-3 years then organizations can focus on actual leadership development, MOS specific, and organizational readiness with less interruption.
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SSG Robert Webster
SSG Robert Webster
1 y
CW2 Randy Whitten - Please explain why it (the training) is better if it is in a digitally delivered format.

Considering your area of expertise, I am actually surprised that you did not better qualify your statement.
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SSG Geospatial Intelligence (Geoint) Ncoic
SSG (Join to see)
1 y
My question for the 2-3 year idea, is there a study to help prove infrequent mandatory training creates a more positive or hostile environment?
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MAJ James Woods
MAJ James Woods
1 y
SSG (Join to see) - I'm going off of personal experience where I didn't see any actual change in behavior or culture within multiple working environments whether the training was quarterly, semi-annually or annually. The frequency of training didn't impact organizational culture as much as the peer mentorship and leader culture of the organizations. How many times did I or my senior NCO had to brief weekly my soldiers not to drink and drive, don't get in fights, stay away from these off limits areas, and do the right thing when it comes to interactions with the opposite sex; only to have that one knucklehead in front of my desk Monday morning? Repetition and increased frequency isn't necessarily the answer.
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SSG Geospatial Intelligence (Geoint) Ncoic
SSG (Join to see)
1 y
MAJ James Woods I concur, and in your words, my personal experiences. It's a study I'd love to see and get published, but a positive Command climate honestly feels like the best approach for a soldier to not act up. Knowing someone would get in severe trouble held deter that negative behavior over repetition.

In other words; if I know my CO will support SHARP through words and actions but doesn't have mandatory training conducted every quarter, I'll trust in them more than a CO with a negative outlook on SHARP but pushes only for quarterly mandatory training.
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1SG Cj Grisham
11
11
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Edited 1 y ago
By getting rid of flag officers. All joking aside, the best way to get away from it is to return to a mission base Focus. We need a fundamental shift and our mindset away from a Garrison mentality to a warrior mentality and stop worrying about all of this social engineering nonsense.
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1SG Cj Grisham
1SG Cj Grisham
1 y
All joking aside, that should have said.
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SSG Military Pay Technician
SSG (Join to see)
1 y
I wholeheartedly agree 1SG
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SFC Roland Dell
SFC Roland Dell
1 y
Absolutely, eventually this will have a retention backlash!
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SPC Kelley McMahan
SPC Kelley McMahan
1 y
I agree Top. when will the DoD finally figure out that outside of military journalism or Public Affairs and perhaps 18 series that we are not there to make nice and be pretty. We are there to take ground from the enemy, chase them down put our boots on their necks and put an end to their operations end of fragging file. No barracks inspection anywhere ever, proves that a (insert branch here) could and would engage in a point blank firefight at the drop of a hat and do their jobs. And to quote Hollywood for a moment, namely prisoner 11 in The dirty Dozen, while masquerading as a General, "very pretty Colonel, but can they fight?"
Hopefully now that we have Chaos as Sec Def that can change and the Generals will get their act together.
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SSG(P) Civil Affairs Specialist
5
5
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Edited 1 y ago
As far as nitpicking goes... the Accident Avoidance Course was probably the least invasive mandatory training out there (once every four years), and the easiest to conduct on-site (any Master Driver should have the materials and even the blank cert, and it takes an hour to cover). CTIP is a prime example of a course that can be covered in literally 15 minutes... if you take a 10 minute break half-way through. Then, there's TRiPS: "Yes, PVT...I know you aren't leaving for your pass, but we still need a TRiPS assessment from the CP to your quarters." So really, yes, this is a good thing, but as far as common sense, Mission Command, and trusting your people goes...it's too long in coming, and not nearly good enough. I'm glad it's being addressed, but for real - how much will it change things in an Army where odds are high that at least one person in every CoC has been brought up thinking that the only way to get promoted is to stand head and shoulders above their peers on top of a 12' high stack of generic "training" certs?
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SFC Harry H.
SFC Harry H.
5 mo
Being a police officer and in the Guard, I use to incorporate local law and some city ordance with accident avoidance. I rarely ever see that and I think it needs to be incumbent into training, active duty, reserves, and guard. We move our military vehicles about city highways and streets and I have seen on LE duty, Guard and active duty Soldiers committing traffic infraction all the time. Some of which I know they do not realize they’re committing. Anyways, just my two cents.
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